Age Of Maturity Of Male Birds

The age of maturity of male birds will differ between species of birds. The maturity refers to the age at which the males reach sexual maturity and will start breeding with their female partners.

Quail = about 60 days old.

Hen = about 6-8 months old.

Partridges = male grey partridges mature from about 10-12 months old.

Pheasants = about 6-7 months old.

Guinea fowl = about 8-10 months old.

Ducks = about 8 months old.

Turkeys = about 8 months old.

Geese = about 8 months old.

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Age Of Maturity Of Female Birds

The age of maturity of female birds will differ between species of birds. The maturity refers to the age at which the females reach sexual maturity and will start laying eggs and breeding with their male partners.

Quail = about 50 days old (I have observed that female Japanese quail will start to lay eggs from about 6-8 weeks old.)

Hen =  about 6-8 months old.

Partridges = female grey partridges mature from about 10-12 months old.

Pheasants = about 6-7 months old.

Guinea fowl = about 8-10 months old, however female guinea fowl can start to lay as early as from 16 weeks old.

Ducks = about 4 months old, generally domestic ducks will start to lay from 21 to 26 weeks of age. My khaki campbell ducks started to lay from about 20 weeks old.

Turkeys = about 7 months old.

Geese = about 7 months old.

If you would like a book on keeping any of the birds mentioned in this article then visit the farmingfriends book shop to browse through our collection of books on sale.

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Advice About Incubating Chukar Partridge Eggs

I have been asked for advice about incubating chukar partridge eggs.

Hi all, I am new at this forum and almost as new with raising Chukar partridges. I live in Australia and we dont have alot of info or support with regards to getting Chukar out and about! Hope someone can help
Have 6 pairs of adults have been incubating the eggs for the past few months in a Brinsea fully automatic incubator and then transferring them into a manual tray incubator at day 19. Have altered the temp and humidity so many times, each batch gets 99.5F and different humidity %. Using a dry bulb thermometer. Nothing is yielding good success. We started off with temp at about 99.5F and humidity at 50%. Then kept temp the same and bumped up humidity we are now at 65% for the first 19 days and last 3 its over 70%. Poor success rates and not one has pipped and hatched on their own. They seem to still grow too big for the egg so cant break out of the shell. They also get stuck from the ‘stuff’ in the egg and we end up helping to peel away the shell, sometimes they bleed a bit. Those that we help generally survive and thrive, but its such a hard distressing thing to do and to watch them suffer.
Can anyone give me any advice everything i read conflicts everything else. What am i doing wrong?

Cheers Tania

Hi Tania,
Welcome to the farmingfriends forum.

I have not hatched partridges and only raised one partridge from a few days old when my fatherinlaw found the partridge chick in the farm yard and no sign of the mother.
Here is a link to reasons why they don’t hatch on own http://farmingfriends.com/reasons-why-fully-formed-chicks-may-not-hatch-out/
Reasons for pipped eggs but not hatching http://farmingfriends.com/reasons-for-pipped-eggs-but-chicks-not-hatched/
Here’s the info about hatching that I have on incubating chukar eggs http://farmingfriends.com/incubating-chukar-partridge-eggs/

Incubation Period – The incubation period for chukar partridge eggs is 23-24 days.

Incubation Temperature – The temperature in the incubator for chukar partridge eggs is 99.5 degrees fahrenheit.

Humidity Levels – The humidity level (wet bulb thermometer) for chukar partridge eggs is 80-88 degrees fahrenheit.

Final Day Of Egg Rotation – The final day of egg rotation for chukar partridge eggs is day 21.

I have a book Modern Partridge farming and I will see if there is any info in this about chukar partridges.

Do you place water in the incubator throughout the incubation period?

Hope we can help you get your hatching rates to improve. I will do some research in the next few days.
Kind regards
Sara @ farmingfriends

If you have any advice for Tania about hatching chukar partridge eggs then please leave a comment below or alternatively leave a comment on the forum discussion about incubating chukar partridge eggs.

Here is a book about Modern Partridge Farming:

If you keep partridges or are thinking of keeping partridges then join the free farmingfriends game birds forum for the latest chat, advice and questions about partridges and game bird related issues.

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Learning About Golden Pheasants

Scott from Ozark Bantams website has sent me a message about his golden pheasants and as I have only seen golden pheasants on a petting farm I was interested to learn more about them.

  • I raise golden pheasants, and I can say they are a pleasure to keep.
  • The males are always showing off and displaying.
  • They are really easy to keep… just basic shelter, quality food, and clean water.
  • Mine started laying a couple of weeks ago, and I’ve not got several of their eggs incubating right now. They are due to hatch in early May.

I sent Scott a reply asking if golden pheasants could be kept free range and if they would mix with other poultry.

Hi Scott,
Glad you liked Zoe’s guest article. Golden pheasants are beautiful looking birds. I have  only seen one at a petting farm. Can they free range during the day and come back to their shelter at night? Do they mix with other poultry ok as I have hens, guinea fowl and ducks?
Good luck with your eggs you are incubating – let us know how you get on.
Just to let you know that I have a free forum which has alot of active members who I am
sure would be interested to hear about your golden pheasants.
http://farmingfriends.com/forums/

Your website and blog is interesting.
Kind regards
sara @ farmingfriends

I was delighted to receive a reply from Scott with more information about the golden pheasant.

Sara,
Thanks for making me aware of the forum. And thanks for the compliment on our web site and blog. I’m glad I found you site as well. To answer your question,

  • I’ve heard of people who have free ranged their goldens but it takes time and patience from a very young age. I am assuming they would have to be supervised outside while young.
  • I do not free range my goldens as they are a wild bird. Though I suspect they would stay near the pens if let out, I’m not sure they would willingly return at night.
  • And goldens are not easy to catch once free.
  • They should not be kept with domesticated chickens, as pheasants are more prone to diseases that chickens can carry and withstand.
  • They can, however, be kept with some other breeds of pheasant and peafowl.

Do you ever have guests write articles or reviews on your site?
Regards,
Scott
www.ozarkbantams.com

I look forward to Scott’s guest article on my website as I think golden pheasants are beautiful birds.

Here is a book about Modern Pheasant Rearing:

If you keep pheasants or are thinking of keeping pheasants then join the free farmingfriends game birds forum for the latest chat, advice and questions about pheasants and game bird related issues.

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How High Can Peafowl Jump With Clipped Wing?

I was recently asked about the affects of wing clipping on peafowl,

Hello How high will peafowl jump with a clipped wing to tertiary feathers

Many thanks.

Sue

I don’t have experience of peafowl or of clipping wings as I have never clipped my guinea fowl, hens or ducks wings, so am unsure of the answer.

I have read that hens can jump between 5′ and 8′ with clipped wings.

I also read it is best to just clip one wing as this makes the bird off balanced when trying to jump, but if both wings are clipped they have more balance making it easier for them to jump higher.

If anyone has any advice for Sue, let me know, thanks.

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Incubating Gambel’s Quail Eggs

Gambel’s Quail are are found in arid areas of the southwestern United States and parts of Mexico. The Gambel quail egg is a pale buff to white colour with moderate pink/brown spots.

Incubating Gambel’s Quail Eggs
Incubation period = 21-23 days
Temperature = approximately 99.75 degrees F
Humidity = wet bulb of 83 F

If you keep quail and want to ask a question to get some advice or just to chat about your quail then why not join the free farmingfriends quail forum.

Check out the following books about keeping and raising quail.

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Incubating Quail Eggs From Different Quail Breeds

I was recently asked about the incubation period and temperature and humidity levels for incubating eggs from different quail breeds.

Japanese Coturnix Quail
Incubation period = 17 days
Temperature = approximately 99.5-99.9º F
Humidity = wet bulb humidity of around 84-88º F

Bobwhite Quail
Incubation period = 21-24 days usually 23-24 days
Temperature = approximately 99.5-99.75º F
Humidity = wet bulb humidity of around 84-86º F

California Valley Quail
Incubation period = 22-23 days
Temperature = approximately 99.75 degrees F
Humidity = 84 to 86 degrees F wet bulb

Gambel’s Quail
Incubation period = 21-23 days
Temperature = approximately 99.75 degrees F
Humidity = wet bulb of 83 F

Mountain Quail
Incubation period = 24-25 days
Temperature = approximately 99.75 degrees F
Humidity = Wet Bulb of 82 to 84 degrees F

Blue Scaled Quail
Incubation period = 22-23 days
Temperature = approximately 99.75 degrees F
Humidity = Humidity: 82 to 84 degrees F wet bulb.

Harlequin Quail
Incubation period =15-18 days
Temperature = 37.6° Celsius
Humidity = ?

Mearns Quail
Incubation period = 24 – 25 days

If you keep quail and want to ask a question to get some advice or just to chat about your quail then why not join the free farmingfriends quail forum.

Check out the following books about keeping and raising quail.

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White Barb Pigeons

I was recently asked a question relating to incubating pigeon eggs and in answering the question I have begun to learn abit about white barb pigeons.

good day, will my pigeon eggs spoil if they dont lie on them for the first day or two after laying? Chappy

Hi Chappy,
Thanks for visiting farmingfriends and leaving your comment about pigeon eggs.The pigeon eggs won’t spoil if the pigeons don’t sit on the eggs for  the first few days. When birds lay their eggs they will lay one a day until they have a clutch of eggs and then the pigeon will sit on the eggs. It is only at the point of sitting on the eggs when the conditions are right that incubation will start. So the egg laid on the first day will still hatch at the same time as the egg laid on subsequent days!
Hope this helps. Good luck with the hatch.
Let me know how your pigeons get on. Are they wild pigeons or do you keep pigeons?

Kind regards
Sara @ farmingfriends

They are not wild pigeons they are a pair of white barbs, I bought them three months ago at a nearby pet shop, at first I thought they were old because they only laid one egg, three times, the first time the male kicked it out the box , the second crumbled under the weight of the male four days into incubation, the third also crumbled fifteen days with squab inside, it died. I got frustrated and decided to do some research which led to the issue of grit, I went out and got me some along with some crabshells, grind them up and made an unleavened bread, fed them. To my suprise this time they laid two eggs…I will let you know how they fair.

I am looking forward to learning more about the white barb pigeons and how Chappy’s pigeons get on with incubating the eggs.


Guest Appearance – Golden Pheasants By Allandoo Pheasantry

Zoe A. Hunter from Allandoo Pheasantry is a breeder of ornamental and rare species of pheasant. Zoe has written about the Golden Pheasant.

The most popular of the Ornamental Pheasants to keep in an aviary is undoubtedly the Golden Pheasant.

Golden Pheasant

Golden Pheasant

It is not difficult to see why as the colours of this bird are dazzling. With scarlet, bright yellow and orange, a deep royal blue and a rich dark green with some of the feathers edged in a velvety black the Golden Pheasant is one of the world’s most colourful creatures.

As well the outstanding colour the Golden Pheasant can easily become tame. They may not like to be cuddled but, with a little patience, most birds will learn to eat from your hand and they may well hop up onto a lap or an arm.

The Golden Pheasant is extremely hardy and easy to look after. Although a shelter is needed this can be very basic without added heat. They enjoy a varied diet which means they are quite easily satisfied with all sorts of seed, nuts, fruit and vegetables and although not a necessity live food would certainly be relished.

Golden Pheasants

Golden Pheasants

If adding plants to the aviary Golden Pheasants will enjoy a nibble but they are not as destructive as many other birds and most plants in a reasonable sized aviary will still manage to thrive.

Golden Pheasants are fairly cheap to buy and will always be admired. They are in need of conservation as their habitat in the wild is rapidly disappearing. Always look for pure Goldens as many hybrids are sold which will make it much harder to keep these gorgeous birds for future generations to see.

Golden Pheasants by Zoe A. Hunter. Allandoo Pheasantry


Sallie’s Golden Pheasant Chicks

Sallie is a “farmingfriends” friend who I have made friends with since she visited my website to find out about splayed legs in quail.

Sallie keeps quail and pheasants and I have enjoyed seeing the photos of the chicks and hearing about their progress and learning about the differences in the breeds.

Dear Sara,   The original 7 ringneck pheasant chicks are now a month old and doing well.

10 Golden Pheasant Chicks

10 Golden Pheasant Chicks

10 Golden Pheasant Chicks

10 Golden Pheasant Chicks



Photos are of 10 Golden Pheasant Chicks which hatched last weekend (about 20th June).  3 had duff legs (not splayed but almost as if the hock joint was fused really bent)  lost one last night but don’t know if the other two will make it – doubtful I think.  The Golden’s are much quieter than the ringneck and not as spooky.  Just put 62 quail eggs in the incubator so will really be under pressure if they all hatch.  May have to put them in a stable rather than the sitting room!!!   Hope all well with you.   Best Wishes     Sallie.

It’s amazing the places that chicks are kept. My first set of guinea fowl keets that I hatched back in 2005 were kept in a brooder in the kitchen (not very hygenic I know but it is a farmhouse kitchen!), Sallie’s email suggests she has kept her chicks in the sitting room and one of the members of the farmingfriends forum, Mary Jayne has kept her guinea fowl keets in a bedroom.

Do you keep or raise pheasants and have you kept the chicks in strange palaes?

Here is a book about Modern Pheasant Rearing:

If you keep pheasants or are thinking of keeping pheasants then join the free farmingfriends game birds forum for the latest chat, advice and questions about pheasants and game bird related issues.

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