Can You Eat Guinea Fowl Eggs?

Can you eat guinea fowl eggs? Yes is the answer and they are “eggstremely” tasty – my opinion!

Did you know?

  • Roughly 2 guinea fowl eggs = 1 large chicken egg.
  • Guinea eggs are brown.
  • The shells are very hard!
  • In the laying season, guinea hens lay daily.                      
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Guinea Fowl Do Not Like Snow – They Think It’s Foul!!

December 2005 –  I had a bit of a problem today when I tried to put the guinea fowl back in their huts. They do not like to stand and walk in the snow which has arrived just a little late to make it a white Christmas. Typical! This snow was going to be a big problem to me as the ground was heavily carpetted and the poultry huts were surrounded.There was no way of reaching the huts without putting your foot in it! 

When I herded the guinea fowl towards their huts, they kept flying back to the dry land they had found! Not that I blame them – if I’d originated from Africa, I don’t think I would like the snow either!

Eventually I managed to get the poults (young guinea fowl) and Hatty the Hen into their huts but the adult guinea fowl (the royal trio!) have a mind of their own. They decided to fly up into the trees in the orchard and roost there for the night. Oh well, they’ve roosted over night in the trees before, so I’m sure they’ll be ok.

 

This is Charlie roosting in the trees in the Orchard to get away from the snow!

This is Charlie roosting in the trees in the Orchard to get away from the snow!

The next day came and there was still no sign of the snow melting. Charlie, Camilla and Diana were happily perched above the snowy carpet surveying their kingdom. They don’t seem to want to come down. Well, we certainly know who the boss is and it’s not me!

I decided not to get the others out, as I felt sure they would join the royal trio.

Great news! When I returned later in the day to check on the poultry, the females, Camilla and Diana, had flown down and were proudly sitting on top of their run. Lets hope I can manage to coax them back into the warmth of their hut. We’ll see who’s the boss now……..no, it’s still not me, they’ve flown back up to join Charlie. I’m just going to have to wait for the snow to melt.

As New Year’s Eve dawned, the snow was melting fast and the roosting trio had finally decided to descend from the trees and were now ready to go back in, thank goodness! I bet the guinea fowl’s New Year’s Resolution was to avoid snow at all cost. I’m sure they think the snow is foul!

If you keep guinea fowl and want to ask a question to get some advice or just to chat about your guinea fowl then why not join the free farmingfriends guinea fowl forum.

Front Cover Of Incubating, Hatching & Raising Guinea Fowl Keets An eBook

If you fancy having a go at incubating, hatching and raising guinea fowl keets then check out my Incubating, Hatching & Raising guinea Fowl Keets eBook and if you are in the UK then I also have guinea fowl eggs for hatching for sale (UK Spring and Summer months).

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Cattle and Guinea Fowl Do Not Mix!

Cattle and guinea fowl do not really mix well together. I first realised this last year when my housework was interrupted by an awful lot of squawking.

Picture the scene….. Farmer’s wife with feather duster in hand, poised and ready to dust, when suddenly the tranquil calm was disturbed by the machine gunner noise of a gang of guinea fowl.

My only thought at first was that the birds must be getting close to the house. I didn’t really pay too much attention, until I heard lots of mooing from the cow shed. When I looked out of the window I could see the red comb of Hatty the Hen in amongst the big, burly cattle. Without a thought for my housework, I fled to the cattle shed to rescue Hatty.

Upon closer inspection, all the guinea fowl and the resident partridge were also in the fold yard with Hatty, trying to peck their way through the straw.

One of the Charolais cows had only had a calf the day before and she wanted to protect it. She was not a happy lady! Her mooing had set off the whole herd of hormonal cows, who by this time were noisily mooing and snorting at the birds.

The birds, however, were not deterred and they stood their ground against the beefy ladies, squawking noisily back. Action needed to be taken, so before any bird, cow or Farmer’s wife could be hurt, I waved my feather duster in the air and chased the poultry back to the orchard, with Hatty the Hen leading the way!

On this occasion the story ended happily with the poultry and cattle living harmoniously side by side………that is until Christmas morning 2006 when my housework was again interrupted by an awful lot of squawking.

Picture the scene….. Farmer’s wife with oven glove in hand ready to serve the Christmas luncheon to sixteen people, when suddenly the hustle and bustle of Christmas preparations was disturbed by the machine gunner noise of a gang of guinea fowl.

This time I knew what to expect and it wasn’t the pleasant exchange of Christmas greetings between bird and cattle. Unfortunately the scene that faced me on this occasion was that of a battle ground with the cattle looking close to victory. The heavily pregnant cows had managed to trap the foraging birds into a corner and they were kicking up a fuss.

I cautiously entered the battle ground and began attempts to rescue the cowering poultry. Most of them saw their chance to escape and ran for safety. However two of the gang had been injured in battle and had to be carried to safety. As you can see, cattle and guinea fowl really and truely do not mix!

I’m pleased to report that the two casualties made a full recovery. The guinea gang appear to have learnt their lesson, (I hope!) since there hasn’t been any foraging for food in the fold yard recently. Although it is fair to say that this latest battle was won by the cattle, I just know that this war is not over. The unperturbed guinea fowl have now taken to slowly, very slowly, strutting past the cattle shed, just getting close enough to cause a disturbance, without getting close enough to lose another battle!

Guinea Fowl Chicks

Guinea Fowl Keets

Guinea fowl chicks are called keets.

Guinea Fowl Keet

They are born with their eyes open.                          

Two Newborn Keets

Their bodies are covered in down when they are first born. 

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Keets can drink and feed themselves without trouble after 24 hours.

A Gang Of Guinea Fowl Keets

They eat crushed up chick crumbs for the first 6 weeks.

Different Coloured Guinea Fowl Keets

Keep the keets in a brooder with a temperature of between 95-100F for the first 2 weeks and then reduce the temperature by 5 degrees F each week until week 6/8 when heat can be discontinued.

Many Guinea Fowl Keets

Guinea chicks have weaker legs than chickens and can get spraddled legs if they are kept on a smooth surface. Use carpet in an indoor brooder and dry litter in an outdoor brooder.

Guinea Fowl Gender Identification

It is very difficult to identify the male and female guinea fowl birds. This picture shows the male on the left and the female on the right. From this picture you can see that the male has a larger helmet and wattles than the female.

Male And Female Guinea Fowl

Male And Female Guinea Fowl

Female Guinea Fowl .V. Male Guinea Fowl

Females hang lower to the ground .V. Males have more upright posture.

Females have smaller wattles .V. Males have longer, larger cupped wattles.

Females make 1 and 2 syllable calls .V. Males only make 1 syllable call.

Females have smaller helmets .V. Males have larger helmets.

Go to Video gallery to watch a video clip of a female guinea fowl and hear her call.

Calling All Guinea Fowl Enthusiasts!

Are you interested in raising guinea fowl? OR Do you already have guinea fowl? If so this is the blog for you! I wanted to set up this blog so that more of the world can learn about these amazing birds and guinea fowl enthusiasts around the globe can share  guinea fowl information. My name is Sara and I live in the North of England. For the last 5/6 years I have been keeping and raising guinea fowl.

Flock Of Guinea Fowl

Flock Of Guinea Fowl

My flock currently consists of 23 birds, 20 of which I have reared myself. I am not an expert on guinea fowl, just a very keen enthusiast who wants to share what I have learnt and observed over the last few years.

If you keep guinea fowl and want to ask a question to get some advice or just to chat about your guinea fowl then why not join the free farmingfriends guinea fowl forum.

Front Cover Of Incubating, Hatching & Raising Guinea Fowl Keets An eBook

If you fancy having a go at incubating, hatching and raising guinea fowl keets then check out my Incubating, Hatching & Raising guinea Fowl Keets eBook and if you are in the UK then I also have guinea fowl eggs for hatching for sale (UK Spring and Summer months).

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