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keeping duck eggs clean

(16 posts)

  1. duskhunter
    Member

    I cannot seem to get clean eggs from 'the girls' no matter what I provide them with. They will not use a nesting box so I find eggs on the floor anywhere in their house.

    Exactly what is dangerous about washing them? I know the shell is more porous than a chickens egg but surely all the excrement attached to them can permeate the shell too.

    I am finding one of the eggs is smaller 50% of the time why is this? Presumably she is the one that laid the 'fart' egg a couple of weeks ago.

    Posted 6 years ago #
  2. Pastordot
    Member

    I worry about that too, but I don't want them looking dirty when I give them away, and certainly don't want excrement on them.

    I have been scrubbing mine with a wet scotchbrite scouring sponge and then I dry them off right away. I don't immerse them in the water though because of the statements about them being so porous.

    Hopefully others will have more answers for you (and me).

    Blessings,
    Dottie

    Posted 6 years ago #
  3. dollydylo
    Member

    Hi Duskhunter

    I do the same as Dottie, although I do sometimes rinse them under a tap if really grubby.

    Looking forward to some more replies as I think your question is a very valid one!

    Karen x
    Posted 6 years ago #
  4. the time old question, this has been asked so many times and even if you google it I can't find an official answer to this question,
    this link is to a post just a year ago,
    http://farmingfriends.com/forums/topic.php?id=1083

    If it needs to be done I will use a slightly damp kitchen pan scourer to clean off my eggs, then dry them quickly with kitchen roll, I have read and infact was told on here that if you do use water at least use water warmer than the egg and that to stops the germs from entering

    I think one difference is and this is only my opinion, we all know that when the eggs are layed they are covered in a protective film which will keep germs from poo, bedding etc out of the egg, once we begin washing and scrubbing we damage and remove the protective layer so any germs on the egg can then be washed in,

    mo x
    Posted 6 years ago #
  5. duskhunter
    Member

    Unfortunately none of these links really answers my question.

    Running under a tap is washing it.

    A damp tissue would be torn to pieces by some of the eggs by the time I find them - goodness knows what time they are laid as I am often there by 5am and at least one egg is cold.

    I have been sanding them but this doesn't get rid of the staining just makes them smooth.

    I like my boiled poached and fried eggs runny.

    I found an egg on the garden path in the wet as it had been raining all day yesterday and today, do I eat it?

    As there seems to be no categorical answer I must use the same kind of common sense my doctor used when I phoned him in a panic to tell him that my little rescue dog had just sicked up worms and I was also babysitting my grandaughter who had just started to crawl.

    He said that most dogs were family pets and that he would certainly not be prescribing any treatment and that I was only worried because it was not my child. He,I know has 6 children, a dog and chickens.

    It seems we all use some water to clean the shell because this is the only way to make them presentable/acceptable.

    My neighbour has chickens who the vet injects against salmonella, I didn't know such a thing was possible, is this what they do in large commercial set ups?

    My vet said there are only really problems where large quantities of animals are intensively farmed and that I do not as yet have enough animals to worry about anything serious, even my ponies are not now wormed as a preventative but are tested by a dung sample to see if they have worms before any treatment is recommended.

    Posted 6 years ago #
  6. I use an old wooden nail brush to clean my hen eggs. I generally drop them in cold water for 10 minutes to soften any matter on the shell then give them a gentle scrub under cold running water. Duck eggs are notoriously difficult to get clean because of the shell colour, predominantly white or pearly blue. So long as you get the majority off the egg they will be fine. As for selling them, if people are put off by the stains tell them to buy them from a supermarket, they'll soon forget about the slight imperfections. ;)

    Posted 6 years ago #
  7. Mama
    Member

    Hi Angela, were as washing eggs isn't good if you are incubating them as everyone says germs can permiate the shell thus leading to dead embryos. I personally washed my eggs duck and geese eggs with a damp scourer and dried immediately as Mo does (the ones with the green sides ). Never had to wash the hens as they behaved and laid in the nest boxes which were always clean .As for the salmonella ,yes it is only large breeders that do that .Had all sorts of fowl for many years and never had any injected or any illnesses thankfully .Mama

    Goose Girl
    Posted 6 years ago #
  8. Angela, you might not like this but I had 5 eggs in the shed this morning, one girl not laying, only 1 needed a clean and that was just to remove woodshavings that had stuck to the egg

    as to laying outside if I found an egg in mud that had been rained on for an hour, I would throw it away but thats just me as I have more than enough to keep myself and my neighbours who I sell to happy

    as to hens I cant comment as I dont have any but I have never heard anyone say they are notoriously difficult to get clean, unless like mentioned layed out doors in mud, and again personel choice but id never eat an egg that had been soaked in water for 10 mins sorry

    mo x
    Posted 6 years ago #
  9. dollydylo
    Member

    I have hens and ducks, and have never had any need to wash my hen eggs.. they lay in the nests so they are clean when collected.

    The ducks are clean enough if they lay in the morning before I let them out, and the eggs don't land in a pile of poo!!! I find that they are sometimes coated in some egg yolk which means the straw sticks to them, hence the need for a quick wash and clean.

    Karen x
    Posted 6 years ago #
  10. duskhunter
    Member

    Luckily the egg on the path was on a clean piece of paving and quite clean itself ao I had it for breakfast. I am a believer in a peck of dirt doing no harm. If things are too sanitised it can make us 'precious' and more suseptible to any germs.

    HOWEVER, PLEASE NOTE I AM SENSIBLE which is why I have been asking all these questions. Disappointingly, it seems there are no fresh opinions on this subject from the last discusion on the matter and now as then it is left up to the individual to draw their own conclusions about how to treat mucky eggs.

    Posted 6 years ago #
  11. Mama
    Member

    LOL Angela ,Don't think anyone never doubted the sensible and think we all agree to sanitised is not too good .We didn't have all these sanitised wipes in my day and two healthy boys I had who ate worms and mud !!!! That's off topic and yes there seems no set rule up to us all what we do .Mama

    Goose Girl
    Posted 6 years ago #
  12. campbell ridge
    Administrator

    Hi Angela. I don't often get pristine clean duck eggs either, even when they lay on fresh clean straw. 4/6 will need a good scrub if being sold but if it's just for us we don't bother. We clean with sandpaper for selling. We also eat them from the garden after being out for a day but would not sell them just in case. But from our point of view a few germs is healthier than no germs.
    My chickens never lay pooey eggs like the ducks. I guess it just depends on the timing of the lay coinciding with defecation just before.

    Sarah L
    Posted 6 years ago #
  13. duskhunter
    Member

    Thank you everyone for your advice, help and tales of experience. Real life is often so different from the theory/official version - common sense must prevail I feel. If we are led to believe the t.v. ads we must kill 99.9% of household germs - it is amazing anyone has ever grown into adulthood.

    You said, Sarah that you would eat an egg that has been in the garden for a day but not sell it just as a precaution, even though it was more than likely fine. Me too, that is what I meant when I said I am sensible. If I found it in the pond I wouldn't although have done so inadvertently by picking up an egg in the kitchen which shouldn't have been there - have no idea how long it had been there could have been up to three weeks or just 48 hours.

    I gave my daughter some eggs and she was afraid to use them as they hadn't been in her fridge for 5 days, she left them on the kitchen work surface. She gave them to a friend for baking. There will be mixed view on this I expect - I had read that duck eggs keep longer than chickens for up to a month in the fridge, but what about out of the fridge? when I was a child we only had a larder with a mesh of wire guaze in the window instead of glass to the outside to keep the food cool.

    Posted 6 years ago #
  14. Lorna
    Member

    I clean my eggs under hot water cleaning with a nail brush and then steep them in egg sanitant for up to 15 mins as I sell them. If some are mucky I just use as nest markers etc.

    Lorna

    Posted 6 years ago #
  15. Lorna not sure what your brand recomends but everything
    I have read like in this link below it says to just spray not soak the egg and that they should be washed again to remove the sanitizer before use
    http://www.ehow.com/how_6110626_sanitizing-fresh-eggs.html

    mo x
    Posted 6 years ago #
  16. Lorna
    Member

    No they are recommened to stay in the sanitant up to 15mins and dry off naturally, it is the powder chicktec one.

    Posted 6 years ago #

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