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kune kune pigs

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  1. katiedyer
    Member

    HEllo again i think coleen is pregnant again. so we make her a farrowing crate. just want to see what you think. it is made off wood and is like a big box with an opening and no lid but it has a shelf around the sides the she doesnt lay on the babies as she cant get under there if that makes sence!? do you think this is ok or should i take them away from her? i have only left straw in her farrowing crate to encourage her to nest in there is that ok? the barn she is in is very big and has a concrete floor i wasnt sure wheather tto put some straw over the whole floor just a thin layer? any suggestions?

    Posted 7 years ago #
  2. Hi Katie,
    You won't need to take the piglets away from coleen unless she is very aggressive and this doesn't always happen.
    I would make sure that there is plenty of straw in the ground both in the crate and on the floor. Rig up a lamp near the crate so that the piglets when they are born can head towards the lamp but not too far from the sow.
    The concrete floor will be too cold for the piglets they need plenty of straw to keep them warm.
    Good luck with the farrowing.
    Let us know how it goes.
    Kind regards
    sara @ farmingfriends

    Posted 7 years ago #
  3. Hi

    If the sow is calm and happy she is less likely to be agressive. They often like to chew straw around farrowing time - so it may help her to keep happy.
    One of the main dangers leading to squashed piglets, is when the sow has been standing up, and lies down. When she is standing, if the piglets are cold they often lie close to her, then when she flops down they are too sleepy to get out of the way. If the piglets have a warm, cosy place to go to when they are not suckling, they will usually go there.
    The warm, cosy place for piglets will be just out of the sows reach, so she cannot fall on them. The sow likes it to be close to her head, so that she can see her litter & make sure they are OK. The lamp should be far enough away from the sow, so she does not get too hot.
    Good luck - hope all goes well
    TopVeg

    Posted 7 years ago #
  4. katiedyer
    Member

    she hasnt eaten today as if not getting out of her bed that much just to go to the toilet and drink and she is very sweaty! is this a sign of labour? no milk yet though!

    Posted 7 years ago #
  5. Hi Katie,
    When Cagney was about to farrow the first time she didn't want her food and moved all the straw into a nest.
    There are a number of signs to look out for when a sow or gilt is about to farrow.

    http://www.farmingfriends.com/signs-of-a-farrowing-sow-or-gilt/

    Restlessness. The sow or gilt will pace up and down or circle round and round.

    Nesting. The sow or gilt will pull or the bedding material into one area and create a nest. They do this by carrying the bedding in their mouths and moving the straw with their feet. This usually occurs on the day of farrowing and it is an amazing sight to see as all the bedding that was previously covering the barn floor will now all be neatly in a nest shape – this happened when Cagney, my Saddleback sow, had her first litter. I went in to feed her and she was laid on her nest and not one piece of straw was anywhere else in the barn!

    The size and shape of the stomach will increase before farrowing. I try to get into the habit of feeling the sow’s stomachs when I feed them so that I am aware of any changes in size and that the sows get used to me touching this area.

    The size of the mammary glands will increase as they bag up with milk. I also try to touch the teats so that the sows get used to me doing this so that I can check for milk production before the onset of farrowing.

    Milk production. Just before farrowing the sow or gilts milk will be released. You can check this by squeezing the teats and if milk droplets come out then farrowing is close.

    The vulva becomes larger and reddens. The muscles around this area slacken before farrowing takes place. This is not always easy to see to the untrained eye but once your gilt and sow has farrowed once or twice it is easier to identify. it’s amazing how often a pig breeder spends looking at the animals bottom!

    Laying down and stretching out the back legs will occur as farrowing begins. This is not always the case as some gilts and sows will stand to farrow. My saddleback sow Lacy did this when she was a gilt and had her first litter.

    Heavy breathing. As farrowing begins the gilt or sow will start to blow and puff as she strains.

    Her breathing will really change and she will probably lay down. She will pick up bits of straw in her mouth. Try to give her space, if you are keeping an eye on her then try to do so without her noticing as animals often don't like to give birth whilst humans are around. I used to turn the light off in the barn and just had the light of the heat lamp. Make sure that the sow doesn't get too hot from the heat lamp.

    Good luck with the farrowing.
    Best Wishes
    Sara @ farmingfriends

    Posted 7 years ago #
  6. katiedyer
    Member

    still nothing

    Posted 7 years ago #
  7. katiedyer
    Member

    how do you work out the date fr farrowing my pigs mated between the 1st and 5th of august so when are they due?

    Posted 7 years ago #
  8. Hi Katie,
    The gestation period is 3 months, 3 weeks and 3 days. I have a book with a table and it says if served between 1st and 5th Aug then your gilt is due between 24th and 28th November. So a few more days to wait!
    Hope all goes well.
    Kind regards
    Sara @ farmingfriends

    Posted 7 years ago #
  9. katiedyer
    Member

    hi,
    update on coleen. her vulva is still very big but instead of going redder it has got what looks like twhite powder on it not sure what this is or if this is normal its a bit like dry skin! her teats has got really big now nearly on the floor!

    Posted 7 years ago #
  10. Hi katie,
    Sounds like coleen is getting closer. Listen out for her breathing going rapid and she will probably lay down before she starts to farrow. Watch out for straw in her mouth. Even if she is in a crate put plenty of straw in especially near her head and bottom. She will pick up the straw and try to move it to her bottom area! You will definately notice a change in her breathing.

    Get the Video Plugins

    Get a couple of large boxes ready with some straw in them in case you need to remove the piglets from Coleen until she has finished farrowing. when I have done this I put the boxes under the lamp to keep the piglets warm. Make sure the boxes have high sides as the piglets can move about and jump up quite quickly.
    Good luck it could be a long night for you, but an exciting night. All the best to Coleen.
    Kind regards
    Sara @ farmingfriends

    Posted 7 years ago #
  11. katiedyer
    Member

    ok thank you once again for your help we have lots of straw in there

    Posted 7 years ago #
  12. katiedyer
    Member

    how do you know if your sow has absorbed the piglets? still no piglets teats are on the floor no milk either yet!

    Posted 7 years ago #
  13. Hi Katie,
    From your dates you still have a few days left before she might farrow. How do you mean when you say absorb the piglets? Do you mean if she has eaten them?
    Once there is milk it will happen very shortly!
    From my experience they generally farrow at night or in early hours of the morning. they sometimes start mid afternoon and then it leads into evening as they have quite a few piglets.
    Keeping fingers crossed for a safe and easy farrowing for you and Coleen.
    Best Wishes
    Sara @ farmingfriends

    Posted 7 years ago #
  14. Hi All,
    Brian has emailed about his pig who he thinks is close to farrowing.

    hello yall question #1 We have a gilt that we believe is close to forrowing . What I need to know is how can we build somthing that the baby pigs can get under so that the mother wont lay on them but they can still get to her to nurse. #2 should we ware gloves if we need to help the babys or the mother? Look forward to hearing from you---Brian

    Thanks for your advice.
    Kind regards
    sara @ farmingfriends

    Posted 5 years ago #

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