Guinea Fowl Killed By Dog

In the early hours of the morning (2.45am to be precise!) I was awoken to the sound of barking. I jumped out of bed and peered through the curtains to ascertain what was making the noise. I couldn’t see anything. Steve and I decided to get up and check that everything was ok with the guinea fowl, cattle and pigs. Our first stop was the guinea fowl.

When we approached the guinea fowl area a border collie dog ran off. With torch in hand we assessed the situation, hoping that none of the guinea fowl had fallen prey to the dog’s appetite. The torch light revealed the ground covered in guinea fowl feathers and on close inspection we found a dead guinea fowl. The dog had managed to dig it’s way under the hut and had obviously pulled the guinea fowl out. The other five terrified guinea fowl were foolishly still sat near the hole. It’s beyond me why they just didn’t move to the other end of the run, but the mind of a bird is still a mystery to me!

As we checked the other huts and tried to do a head count, I noticed that the A frame which earlier had housed 6 guineas now only seemed to have three. Steve suggested that they must be in the upstairs compartment, yet when I flashed the torch into the opening, no guinea fowl birds were present. Then we saw the opening in the wire and realised that the dog must have taken the three guinea fowl.

Our investigation revealed that three guinea fowl were missing and one was dead. We couldn’t find bodies for the others but daylight would probably reveal the deadly horrors of the night’s attack.

We bricked up the hole near the side of the pen and covered the a frame hole. A quick check of the cattle and pigs found no disturbances caused in either camp much to our relief. We returned to the house to sleep, although mine was a restless sleep as I listened out for the warning cries from my guinea birds or the bark of a menacing dog.

Our investigation revealed that three guinea fowl were missing and one was dead. We couldn’t find bodies for the others but daylight would probably reveal the deadly horrors of the night’s attack.

We bricked up the hole near the side of the pen and covered the a frame hole. A quick check of the cattle and pigs found no disturbances caused in either camp much to our relief. We returned to the house to sleep, although mine was a restless sleep as I listened out for the warning cries from my guinea birds or the bark of a menacing dog.

Day break came and I hurried out to check the full extent of the damage. I was pleased to discover that three guinea fowl had managed to escape and were roosting in the hedgerow just out of “paws”, I mean harms way! What a relief, still only one casualty, although that was one casualty too many. 

We have yet to discover whose dog it is. I just hope that it doesn’t return, although I am moving all my guinea fowl into huts on concrete bases so that predators and pests cannot dig their way under the sides of the huts.

Comments left on this post before website data loss.

1. Oh, I am very sorry about this incident…I hope no more will occur.
Julie
Comment by Julie — November 28, 2007 @ 4:08 am

2. so sorry too, thats not nice at all. and a very bad habit for a domestic dog to have.
Comment by claire — November 28, 2007 @ 8:52 am

3. Oh Sara, I’m so sorry … we lost most of our flock of buff Orpingtons (including several adolescent chicks) to a fox a couple of months ago, and a couple of weeks ago a neighbour’s large dog savaged my very small dog as she was running away … there are few things worse, particularly when you’ve lavished such care on them
And how hard – I speak from experience here – to find out whose dog, without falling out with all your neighbours … and then to make sure that it doesn’t happen again. Attacks by dogs are so much worse than by foxes
Joanna
Comment by Joanna — November 28, 2007 @ 8:55 am
 
4. oh my what a worry! Especially as you don’t know who the dog belonged to!!!
My hubby read an article on Guinea Fowl the other day in the Sunday paper. Having been raised in Africa he decided it might be a good idea to replace our chickens with some when the time comes!! I’m not so sure???
Comment by Libby — November 28, 2007 @ 11:11 am

5. Oh what a shame, Sara and upsetting for you. I do hope that you find the dog’s owner.
I bet the other guinea fowl were rattled by this incident.
Comment by Cottage Smallholder — November 28, 2007 @ 12:01 pm
 
6. Hi Sara, sorry to hear about the guinea fowl attack, it is all happening on your farm as late. Farming is a 24 hour job and such hard work and angst. Let’s hope that you find out who’s dog it is, and why is was out during the night? x
Comment by Louise — November 28, 2007 @ 12:18 pm

7. Sara I know from my own sad experiences the horrid and helpless feeling that comes over you when any of our animals are lost to perdition.
I am so sorry you lost your guinea fowl to the dog.
Comment by Diane — November 28, 2007 @ 6:11 pm

8. our dog did the same thing. yesterday after i got home from school i found a alot of feathers blowing around the wood stove outside and after more looking i found our dog eating the frozen chicken and i took it away from her and kind of spanked her so she wouldnt kill any more, but it didnt really work. she still goes to check and see if there is any in the shed but lucky for the chickens they werent in there.
Comment by bob — January 16, 2008 @ 7:05 pm