Brooder Temperatures For Ducklings

In the farmingfriends forum we have been asked about brooder temperatures for ducklings.

the temp in his brooder is about 93 degrees F. Is that good? or should it be different? Badoodle


If the duckling is moving away from the heat lamp, is laying down alot and panting then the temp is prob too high, if the duckling is huddled under the heat lamp then too low a temp. moving around and sitting in different places usually means the temp is right. The link that Mo gave says, The duckling will need a temperature in the brooder of about 86 degree fahrenheit day one and then by day 7 about 81 degrees.

Once your duckling is dried out and strong enough it won’t rely on the heat lamp so much, like other birds such as guinea fowl.

Check out the following books about ducks and incubating and hatching eggs.

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Do Keets Hatched By Guinea Hen Need Warmth From A Brooder?

I have been asked by a Incubating & Hatching Guinea Fowl Keets eBook customer if keets hatched by a guinea fowl will still need to go into a brooder for warmth.

Yes, I have 3 guinea fowl. 1 girl and 2 boys. I’ve had them since they were 12 weeks and though fairly skittish, they’re pretty tame.

One question. If she does sit on her nest and manages to hatch a family, do the keets have to be brought in to the warmth or can she be allowed to go on caring for them? From everything I’ve read it seems they need warmth for the first 12 weeks.

Thanks again
Anne

Here is my response:

Hi Anne,

Delighted that you like the eBook. I know what you mean about skittish and tame at the same time. My eldest guinea fowl is about 6 years old. He is now beginning to look elderly and the other younger males are now becoming boss. Mine are free range duting the day and go into a hut at night.

If your guinea sits and hatches her eggs, she may keep the keets with her but some say that guinea fowl will abandon their nest before hatch or abandon looking after their keets.

Once you get to the stage where the eggs are hatching I would have a brooder ready with a lamp and suitable flooring and protection from predators and drafts so that the keets can go into the brooder if they are abandoned by mum. They will eat chikc crumbs and like warm water which I put marbles in the drinker so they don’t get their head in it – the ebook will go into detail about brooding keets and the suitbale flooring and temperatures etc. You are right they do need warmth for the first 12 weeks but if the guinea hen is a good mum she will give them warm.

If she does sit on her nest then she will need to be protected from predators as I have found that the guinea fowl tend to lay in hedgerows without protection however when I try to put a run over the nest they tend to get off it.

If she does sit then I would make sure she is kept separate from the males as they may become jealous of the keets.

Good luck – let me know if you do get her to sit and hatch some eggs.

Just to let you kow I have a free forum with a section on guinea fowl. they forum is popular with lots of friendly members. http://farmingfriends.com/forums/

Kind regards
Sara
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Front Cover Of Incubating, Hatching & Raising Guinea Fowl Keets An eBook

If you fancy having a go at incubating, hatching and raising guinea fowl keets then check out my Incubating, Hatching & Raising guinea Fowl Keets eBook and if you are in the UK then I also have guinea fowl eggs for hatching for sale (UK Spring and Summer months).

If you would like to receive regular information about guinea fowl and poultry then why not sign up to the farmingfriends newsletter.

If you keep guinea fowl and want to ask a question to get some advice or just to chat about your guinea fowl then why not join the free farmingfriends guinea fowl forum.

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Brooder Litter For Chicks, Ducklings and Keets

I have received this tip and advice about litter for a brooder.

“The safest, most comfortable ,most hygienic, most chick friendly and cheapest litter for a brooder is clean chopped straw. All you need is a small bale of straw and your lawnmower (with it’s collection bag on if possible). Lay straw on a clean,dry floor and just mow it with up .It could not be easier ,by the way store in a dry bag / place. One square bale of straw will give you and the chicks a lotta pleasure. If you do’nt have a mower, get out the scissors ( get help from a adult please), you will chop a lot of straw in 4/5 minutes. For easier and quicker cleaning of brooder etc ,lay a few sheets of newspaper or cardboard on the bare floor followed by about a half inch of your chopped straw, add some more straw to this every few days,making sure that the chicks feet are always clean.Just roll up and replace when as required. Also for the first 3 to 4 days the chicks are in the brooder place a long single strip of cardboard 6 inches high around the inside of the brooder,rounding the corners, it stops them bunching and smothering.”

Thanks Stephen for this tip.

A litter material is placed on the floor in the brooder to help insulate the floor for the birds comfort and to absorb moisture. Litter also helps control disease and can prevent splayed legs which chicks and keets can easily suffer from if the correct flooring is not provided.

Suitable litter materials include;

  • Wood shavings.
  • ground corncobs.
  • Sawdust.
  • Sugarcane.
  • Rice hulls.
  • Finely chopped straw.
  • Wheat straw.

Whichever litter material is chosen it must be clean, fresh, not mouldy and 2-8 inches or 5-20cms deep.

Unsuitable litter materials include;

  • Newspaper.
  • Paper.
  • Metal.
  • Plastic.
  • Lino.
  • Wood.
  • Ordinary cardboard.
  • Any slippery surface.

Cloth, carpet or corrugated cardboard may be used as a flooring in a small homemade brooder as these surfaces can provide traction for the keets to get a grip on and not slip.

I have successfully reared guinea fowl keets, ducklings and quail chicks on carpet and straw.

If you keep poultry or are interested in keeping poultry then visit the farmingfriends forum for the latest chat.

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Day Old Quail Chicks In Brooder

At Monday tea-time the quail chicks were moved from the incubator to the brooder.

29 Day Old Quail Chicks In Brooder

29 Day Old Quail Chicks In Brooder

There are 29 quail chicks in the brooder and some are dark brown a few are a fawn colouring and one or two are creamy coloured.

The chicks are very lively and quickly found the chick crumbs and started eating them, which they seem to enjoy. They are happy moving about the brooder on the straw and there are no signs of splayed legs.

If you fancy having ago at incubating and hatching and if you live in the UK then I  have  quail eggs for hatching for sale.

Click on the image below to visit Amazon.co.uk to find out more about this incubator or visit one of the Farming Friends Bookshops.


Japanese Quail Chicks Hatching

Yesterday the 42 japanese quail eggs that I had in my incubator where due to hatch. I had been away in the caravan on Saturday night and when I returned on sunday afternoon some of the eggs had pipped and I could definately hear cheeping.

At about 7.15pm one chick hatched by 7.45 there were about 16 and at 9.30 there were 20 with more still pipping. It’s just amazing how quickly they all hatch out. By this morning (Monday) there were about 30 chicks although it was hard to count them.

Apparently quail chicks will call to each other in the shells to synchronise their hatching. I have taken a video of the hatching and some photos and will post them soon.

Tonight I have taken the chicks out of the incubator and put them into a brooder. The chicks were in the incubator roughly 24 hours before moving to the brooder.

The brooder consists of a guinea pig/ rabbit run with a carpet on the floor and them straw on top of the carpet to stop the quail chicks legs from becoming splayed. They have chicks crumbs on a feeder plate and then warm water in a drinker with marbles around the edge to stop the tiny (bumble bee sized) quail from falling into the water and drowning. There is also a heat lamp rigged up over the run to keep the chicks warm.

I have moved 29 chicks out to the brooder and left one of the chicks in the incubator as the chick doesn’t look as lively as the others and seems to have been attacked by some of the chicks as it has some blood on it’s vent area. I am not hopeful for this chick but will keep my fingers crossed. I’ll keep you posted.

If you fancy having ago at incubating and hatching and if you live in the UK then I  have  quail eggs for hatching for sale.

Click on the image below to visit Amazon.co.uk to find out more about this incubator or visit one of the Farming Friends Bookshops.



Video Clip Of Quail Chicks In Brooder

Here are the nine day old japanese quail chicks in the brooder. The chicks are a couple of days old and they were moved to the brooder after they were 24 hours old.

They have a drinker with warm water and marbles in the drinker to prevent them getting their head immersed in the water. They are eating chick crumbs and have a heat lamp to keep them warm. they are on a bed of straw and carpet to stop them getting splayed legs and getting a draught. The chicks are enjoying chasing around the brooder and eating the chick crumbs.

Hope you enjoyed the video clip.

Click on the book image below to visit Amazon.co.uk to find out more about this book or visit one of the Farming Friends Bookshops.


Day Old Japanese Quail Chicks

I moved the day old quail chicks from the incubator after they had been hatched for 24 hours.

Day Old Chicks In Box To Go To Brooder

Day Old Chicks In Box To Go To Brooder

Quail chicks can survive without food and water in the incubator for at least 24 hours as they absorb the yolk sac just before they hatch which provides them with nutirents in the first 24 hours.

Day Old Japanese Quail Chick

Day Old Japanese Quail Chick

I put the quail chicks into a small box to move them to the brooder. The quail chicks are very tiny when they first hatch. They had time to dry off and fluff up in the incubator and once they had been hatched for 24 hours they were very lively indeed. It was difficult to pick them up as they kept trying to jump out of the incubator and my hand!

Japanese Quail Chicks In Brooder

Japanese Quail Chicks In Brooder

The brooder is an outdoor rabbit/guinea pig run and I have placed in on top of an old carpet outside and then put straw in it which will stop the chicks from getting a draught and from getting splayed legs. They have some chick crumbs to eat and a drinker with warm water in it and marbles around the edge to stop the chicks from drowning in the water. There is a heat lamp set up so that the chicks are kept warm enough.

Eight Japanese Quail Chicks

Eight Japanese Quail Chicks

Click on the book image below to visit Amazon.co.uk to find out more about this book or visit one of the Farming Friends Bookshops.



New Guinea Fowl Keets For MeliaMary

One of my regular forum members MeliaMary from Australia has just been sent 25 new guinea fowl keets.

Here are the photos of the guinea fowl brooder with lamp, the guinea fowl keets arrival and day one and two activities from the brooder. You will see the keets eating, huddled together, becoming curious and finally eating from MeliaMary’s hand.

Guinea fowl keets brooder hut with lamp.

Guinea Fowl Brooder Hut

Guinea Fowl Brooder Hut

Guinea Fowl Brooder Hut With Lamp

Guinea Fowl Brooder Hut With Lamp

Guinea fowl keets arrival and in the brooder.

25 New Guinea fowl Keets Arrive

25 New Guinea fowl Keets Arrive

Pearl Guinea Fowl Keets And One Lavendar Guinea Fowl Keet

Pearl Guinea Fowl Keets And One Lavendar Guinea Fowl Keet

Guinea Fowl Keets Settle Down For The Night In Brooder.

Guinea Fowl Keets Settle Down For The Night In Brooder.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Guinea fowl keets feeding on turkey crumbs and being hand fed.

Guinea Fowl Keets Eating Turkey Crumbs

Guinea Fowl Keets Eating Turkey Crumbs

MeliaMary Hand Feeding Guinea Fowl Keets

MeliaMary Hand Feeding Guinea Fowl Keets

One Pearl Guinea Fowl Keet

One Pearl Guinea Fowl Keet

MeliaMary is enjoying keeping her new guinea fowl keets. I am sure that we will see and hear more about them. To read more and find out about the guinea fowl keet’s progress click on this link to go to the farmingfriends forum.


Brooder Temperature For Guinea Fowl Keets

Guinea fowl keets require heat in the brooder for the first 6-8 weeks after hatching and then the heat can usually be turned off after 6-8 weeks depending on the conditions where the brooder is located and the number of birds in the brooder.

Brooder For Guinea Fowl Keets With Heat Lamp

Brooder For Guinea Fowl Keets With Heat Lamp

For guinea fowl keets the brooder temperature should start at about 95-100 degrees fahrenheit (35-38 degrees celsius) for the first 1-2 weeks and then reducing by 5 degrees fahrenheit each week.

When turning off the heat lamp keep an eye on the keets and if they start to huddle together then reconsider turning the lamp on for short periods of time until the keets become accustomed to the ordinary air temperature.

If you keep guinea fowl and want to ask a question to get some advice or just to chat about your guinea fowl then why not join the free farmingfriends guinea fowl forum.

Front Cover Of Incubating, Hatching & Raising Guinea Fowl Keets An eBook

If you fancy having a go at incubating, hatching and raising guinea fowl keets then check out my Incubating, Hatching & Raising guinea Fowl Keets eBook and if you are in the UK then I also have guinea fowl eggs for hatching for sale (UK Spring and Summer months).