Candling Duck Eggs

I have been asked about candling duck eggs.

I haven’t candled eggs myself before but I think it is a good idea so that you can check the eggs are fertile, see the development of the embryo and discard any infertile eggs. I have read that it is ok to candle duck eggs from day 7-10.

Here is an excellent link which shows a daily image of egg candling.

There are lots of duck owners on the farmingfriends forum so I have asked them when they candle their duck eggs.

Here is their advice:

Lisa said,

You can candle eggs from 7 days, do it in a dark room , hold a small torch to the back of the egg, keep the eggs point down so you have the air sac at the top, you can see this, it will look like lighter, look for red spider like lines this is the start of the duckling.

Mo and Mama shared this link http://www.duckeggs.com/hatching-eggs.html

Laura said,

I took them out one at a time and shone a torch into the sac end with a regular torch (I cupped my hand so it just went into the egg) very interesting!

Remember that if you decide to candle your eggs, make sure that you handle the eggs carefully and only take them out of the incubator for a short time.

Check out the following books about ducks and incubating and hatching eggs.

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Colour Of Duck Eggs

Well I now have a real mix of ducks and drake here on the farmingfriends farm!

I have 11 khaki campbells (2 drakes and 9 ducks – one is a doubled breasted khaki) They lay white eggs.

I have a pair of magpie ducks (1 drake & 1 duck) and I think they lay blue/green eggs.

I have two buff orpington ducks and I think they lay white eggs.

I have one white campbell duck and they lay white eggs.

Then I have 2 trout runner drakes, a mallard drake and a cayuga drake!

I have only been getting white eggs until the last week or so and now am getting a large egg with a green tinge to it. I think the white eggs are predominantly from the khaki campbells but one or two of the eggs are smaller so they could be from the buff orpington ducks. I think the greenish egg may be from the magpie duck.

If you keep ducks let us know what breed they are and what colour eggs you get from your ducks.

If you keep ducks or are interested in keeping ducks then check out the books shown above about keeping ducks which are informative and excellent for the beginner and a handy reference for the more experienced duck keeper.

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Recipe Suggestions For Using Duck Eggs

I am often asked if you can eat duck eggs and use them in cooking and baking.

Here is a list of ideas for using duck eggs in baking and cooking.

  • Making lemon curd.
  • Baking cakes – blueberry muffins.
  • Scrambling.
  • Poaching.
  • Making omelettes.
  • Frying for a cooked breakfast or egg and chips.
  • Pickled duck eggs.
  • Making quiches.
  • Hard Boiling for picnics and packed lunches.
  • Soft boiled eggs and soldiers!
  • Making pancakes.
  • French toast.
  • Egg Mayonnaise.
  • Cornbread tastes great using duck eggs.
  • Homemade cheesecake also tastes great using duck eggs.
  • Deviled eggs.
  • Scotch Eggs.

Let me know if you have any recipe suggestions you’d like to share then please leave a comment.

Where To Get License To Sell Duck Eggs In Northern Indiana

I was recently emailed and asked about where to get a license to sell duck eggs in Northern Indiana.

“I have a small flock of Khaki Campbell ducks. I am wanting to sell the eggs. I know that I will need a license to sell them. I live in Northern Indiana, U.S. How do I obtain a license?”

Different countries and different states in the US have different legislation and laws on selling eggs to the public.

I live in the UK so the UK licensing laws are different for selling eggs thathose for the US.

I googled how to obtain a license for selling eggs in the US and found that a license can be purchased from the Health Department and may cost from $75-150 dollars (not sure if this is accurate).

I would contact your local health inspector and find out what the regulations are on duck eggs and how much a license costs.

I don’t know if this pdf will be of help http://www.apppa.org/legalstates.pdf Indiana is on page 17.

If you live in Northern Indiana and know about where to get a license for selling eggs and more specifically duck eggs, then please leave a comment.

If you keep ducks or are interested in keeping ducks then visit the farmingfriends duck forum for the latest chat about ducks and then check out the khaki campbell duck eggs for hatching sales page.

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If you keep ducks or are interested in keeping ducks then check out the books shown above about keeping ducks which are informative and excellent for the beginner and a handy reference for the more experienced duck keeper.

Ducks Eggs Can Be Eaten

I am often asked if you can eat duck eggs. The answer is definately yes. Duck eggs can be used in the same way as hen eggs.

They are particularly good for:

  • omelettes
  • pancakes
  • poaching
  • scrambling

If you enjoy a fry up or a boiled egg for breakfast then a duck egg is a good substitute for a hen egg as it is a large egg!

An excellent serving suggestion for soft boiled duck eggs is to serve them with asparagus.

Duck eggs are excellent for making light and spongy cakes, buns and miffins.

Don’t use duck eggs for making Yorkshire puddings as the Yorkshire puddings tend to be heavy and don’t rise very well.

This is what some of the farmingfriends forum members had to say about duck eggs.

How do you like to eat and use duck eggs, please let us know.

Selling Duck Eggs for Eating

I have been asked about selling duck eggs for eating.

We have two Indian Runners and can get about two 2 three eggs a day, we would like to sell them to the public can anyone tell me the rules and regulations on selling to the public! I have read so many different things I am confused
Thanks
Jess

Hi Jess,

Thanks for your question.

Firstly eggs cannot be washed when they are to be sold in shops or farmer’s markets. I think that if you are just giving your eggs to friends and family then they can be washed but you must wash them in water that is warmer than the egg so that the water doesn’t penetrate the pores of the shell.

If you are selling your eggs in shops and at farmers markets then the eggs have to have a label with were they were produced on them eg the address where the eggs were laid.

Also a best before date needs to go on. I put three weeks on duck eggs as I have been led to believe that there is currently no legislation on duck eggs.

You could contact the egg marketing inspectorate to double check the legislation.

Here are the regional telephone numbers:
South & East Region 01223 533634
Midlands & Wales Region 01902 693145
Northern Region 0113 2305989
Western Region 01179 591000

Hope that helps.
Kind regards
sara @ farmingfriends

If you keep ducks or are interested in keeping ducks then visit the farmingfriends duck forum for the latest chat about ducks and then check out the khaki campbell duck eggs for hatching sales

[eshop_show_product id=’4319,4326′ class=’hilite’ panels=’yes’ form=’yes’]

If you keep ducks or are interested in keeping ducks then check out the books shown above about keeping ducks which are informative and excellent for the beginner and a handy reference for the more experienced duck keeper.

If you would like to receive regular information about ducks then why not sign up to the farmingfriends newsletter.

Enter your email address to receive regular email updates of the farmingfriends website posts:

Delivered by FeedBurner

Reasons Why Ducks May Stop Laying Eggs Or May Not Lay Eggs

There are many reasons why ducks may stop laying eggs or may not lay eggs.

1. The age of the duck – as they get older the amount of eggs may reduce.
2. The health of the duck – illness or parasites can hinder laying.
3. The time of year – the length of daylight can affect egg production.
4. Changes in the type of food given – this may cause problems as the nutritional content of the food may vary.

5. The introduction of new birds to the flock – this may cause undue stress for the duckss as they re-establish a pecking order.
6. Significant changes in routine – can cause stress for the birds.
7. Housing conditions – unclean, overcrowded, dark and cold conditions can cause stress and or illness which may affect egg production.
8. Handling and movement of the birds – transporting ducks, overhandling, incorrect handling and sudden handling may hinder laying if this causes stress for the birds.
9. Vermin and predators – the presence of rats, mice, cats, dogs and foxes may frighten the birds or cause undue stress.
10. Become broody – the duck stops laying because she wants to sit on a nest of eggs and hatch them.

If you keep ducks or are interested in keeping ducks then visit the farmingfriends duck forum for the latest chat about ducks and then check out the khaki campbell duck eggs for hatching sales page.

[eshop_show_product id=’4319,4326′ class=’hilite’ panels=’yes’ form=’yes’]

If you keep ducks or are interested in keeping ducks then check out the books shown above about keeping ducks which are informative and excellent for the beginner and a handy reference for the more experienced duck keeper.

If you would like to receive regular information about ducks then why not sign up to the farmingfriends newsletter.

Enter your email address to receive regular email updates of the farmingfriends website posts:

Delivered by FeedBurner

Broken Duck Eggs

Why do you sometimes go into the duck hut and find that the duck eggs are broken? Do the ducks break the eggs, does the egg get broken when it is laid due to where it is laid, eg the egg hits the wooden nest box, does a predator get in and break the egg, does a hen break the egg, is the duck laying soft shelled eggs? All these are feasible reasons.
I received an email from Sue asking if I might know why her duck eggs keep getting broken.

” Hi Sara, Great site !,we’ve just found it and you seem the ideal person to help with our query. We live in rural Essex and keep 5 laying hens and a pair of Aylesbury’s. Recently the Duck has started laying in her night box, and although the first couple or so were small, she has sorted that out and the eggs are the right size now. Our question is, for the last couple of day’s the egg has been broken, the shell’s are not soft, all our birds run free all day, is it possible that the Drake is doing this as he is to say the least, “the govenor !! ” over all that dares come into our garden even Ralph my daughters Jack Russell. We think that she may be thinking about building a nest as she keeps dissapearing into hedges and hidey places, but for now the night box seems to be the place, any ideas ? Regards Sue….”

This was my response:
Hi Sue,

Glad you like the site and thanks for your message.
It is not unusual that your duck lays in her night box as they lay their eggs usually
early morning.
I wouldn’t have thought that it would be the drake who breaks the eggs although I could
be wrong.
Do the hens and ducks stay in the same hut at night, if so it could be the hens as I have
experience of this myself. My hens and ducks live in the same hut at night and sometimes
the hens will braks the shell of the duck eggs if they don’t have any hen eggs to peck
at. Hens do like to egg eat so this is not uncommon.

If you duck is thinking of sitting then the night box sounds lke it would be a good place
for her to sit. You could encourage her to sit there by placing a pot egg or two in the
night box and then she will continue to lay the eggs. You could take out the duck eggs
and store them correctly for up to 7 days and then put them back under the duck once you
have enough and this would stop the eggs getting broken. My pot egg is actually plastic
but looks just like the duck eggs.

Just to let you know that I have a duck forum which is very popular with members
returning daily to talk about their ducks and ask for advice. You may find it of
interest. http://farmingfriends.com/forums/forum.php?id=5 I will add your enquiry there
and see what the other members say.

Kind regards

Sara @ farmingfriends

Let me know if you have come across duck eggs getting broken and the reason why thet were broken.

If you keep ducks or are interested in keeping ducks then visit the farmingfriends duck forum for the latest chat about ducks and then check out the khaki campbell duck eggs for hatching sales page.

Click on the image below to visit Amazon.co.uk to find out more about this book or visit one of the Farming Friends Bookshops.


Show Winning Duck Eggs & Guinea Fowl Eggs

Our village produce show has just celebrated it’s 20th year which is a great achievement for a small village.

Each year the committee members (me being one of them) look at the categories and make slight changes to the programme and a couple of years ago I suggested an egg category. Since it’s addition to the show, the egg category has been hotly contested. I am yet to win although have won secondand third places in the past with my guinea fowl and leghorn hen eggs.

This year I entered some guinea fowl eggs and khaki campbell duck eggs and was delighted to get second and third place. Roll on next year, the contest is still on to the win first place!

Show Winning Duck Eggs & Guinea Fowl Eggs

Show Winning Duck Eggs & Guinea Fowl Eggs

Have you ever entered eggs for a produce show?

Double Yolked Eggs

A double yolked egg is an egg that has two yolks.

It is caused by two eggs separating from the ovary at the same time and joining into one egg.

Double yolked eggs can be fairly rare. They are sometimes produced by pullets in their first year of laying.

Double yolked eggs can be produced by any bird but they are more frequently found in laying hens and duck breeds.