Learning About Golden Pheasants

Scott from Ozark Bantams website has sent me a message about his golden pheasants and as I have only seen golden pheasants on a petting farm I was interested to learn more about them.

  • I raise golden pheasants, and I can say they are a pleasure to keep.
  • The males are always showing off and displaying.
  • They are really easy to keep… just basic shelter, quality food, and clean water.
  • Mine started laying a couple of weeks ago, and I’ve not got several of their eggs incubating right now. They are due to hatch in early May.

I sent Scott a reply asking if golden pheasants could be kept free range and if they would mix with other poultry.

Hi Scott,
Glad you liked Zoe’s guest article. Golden pheasants are beautiful looking birds. I have  only seen one at a petting farm. Can they free range during the day and come back to their shelter at night? Do they mix with other poultry ok as I have hens, guinea fowl and ducks?
Good luck with your eggs you are incubating – let us know how you get on.
Just to let you know that I have a free forum which has alot of active members who I am
sure would be interested to hear about your golden pheasants.
http://farmingfriends.com/forums/

Your website and blog is interesting.
Kind regards
sara @ farmingfriends

I was delighted to receive a reply from Scott with more information about the golden pheasant.

Sara,
Thanks for making me aware of the forum. And thanks for the compliment on our web site and blog. I’m glad I found you site as well. To answer your question,

  • I’ve heard of people who have free ranged their goldens but it takes time and patience from a very young age. I am assuming they would have to be supervised outside while young.
  • I do not free range my goldens as they are a wild bird. Though I suspect they would stay near the pens if let out, I’m not sure they would willingly return at night.
  • And goldens are not easy to catch once free.
  • They should not be kept with domesticated chickens, as pheasants are more prone to diseases that chickens can carry and withstand.
  • They can, however, be kept with some other breeds of pheasant and peafowl.

Do you ever have guests write articles or reviews on your site?
Regards,
Scott
www.ozarkbantams.com

I look forward to Scott’s guest article on my website as I think golden pheasants are beautiful birds.

Here is a book about Modern Pheasant Rearing:

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If you keep pheasants or are thinking of keeping pheasants then join the free farmingfriends game birds forum for the latest chat, advice and questions about pheasants and game bird related issues.

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What Causes Curled Toes In Poultry?

I have been asked what cause curled toes in poultry and waterfowl chicks.

Curled toes is when the chick, keet or duckling is born with toes or feet that are curled up.

This can be caused by a number of things:

  • Curled feet can be genetic and due to inbreeding. It’s only safe to breed ducks down by three generations, thne new stock needs to be introduced.
  • It can be due to poor nutrition and a vitamin (riboflavin) defiency in the breeding stock.
  • It can also be due to infra red light in the brooder.
  • Conditions in the incubator can also lead to problems – bacteria in the incubator can lead to hatching problems and if bacteria has gone through the shell then it can effect the keet, duckling or chick.

A useful book for a poultry, game and waterfowl keepers is the book Poultry & Waterfowl Problems By Michael Roberts.

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Guest Appearance – Golden Pheasants By Allandoo Pheasantry

Zoe A. Hunter from Allandoo Pheasantry is a breeder of ornamental and rare species of pheasant. Zoe has written about the Golden Pheasant.

The most popular of the Ornamental Pheasants to keep in an aviary is undoubtedly the Golden Pheasant.

Golden Pheasant

Golden Pheasant

It is not difficult to see why as the colours of this bird are dazzling. With scarlet, bright yellow and orange, a deep royal blue and a rich dark green with some of the feathers edged in a velvety black the Golden Pheasant is one of the world’s most colourful creatures.

As well the outstanding colour the Golden Pheasant can easily become tame. They may not like to be cuddled but, with a little patience, most birds will learn to eat from your hand and they may well hop up onto a lap or an arm.

The Golden Pheasant is extremely hardy and easy to look after. Although a shelter is needed this can be very basic without added heat. They enjoy a varied diet which means they are quite easily satisfied with all sorts of seed, nuts, fruit and vegetables and although not a necessity live food would certainly be relished.

Golden Pheasants

Golden Pheasants

If adding plants to the aviary Golden Pheasants will enjoy a nibble but they are not as destructive as many other birds and most plants in a reasonable sized aviary will still manage to thrive.

Golden Pheasants are fairly cheap to buy and will always be admired. They are in need of conservation as their habitat in the wild is rapidly disappearing. Always look for pure Goldens as many hybrids are sold which will make it much harder to keep these gorgeous birds for future generations to see.

Golden Pheasants by Zoe A. Hunter. Allandoo Pheasantry

Rearing Pheasant And Partridge Chicks

I received a comment asking about rearing pheasant and partridge chicks and how long to leave the lamp on in the brooder.

I am thinking of trying to rear some pheasants and partridge this season for my small shoot.I have not done this befor so I just need to know how long i leave day old chicks under the lamp befor moving them out into a night shelter and then runs.befor putting them into the release pens.

Hi Daryll,

Thanks for your enquiry about rearing pheasants and partridges.

I don’t have much experience of rearing pheasants and partridges. Only that we found a young partridge chick and I raised it with the guinea fowl keets that I had in a brooder at the time.

It is recommended that the lamp for pheasants and partridges is a red lamp to keep the birds calm. My partridge was raised under a normal heat lamp though but then I only had 1 partridge and a dozen or so guinea fowl.

I keep my guinea fowl under a heat lamp for the first 6-8 weeks depending on the temperature outside.

For guinea fowl keets the temperature should be 95-100 degrees fahrenheit for the first two weeks and then decreased by 5 degrees fahrenheit each week after that. Watching the behaviour of the chicks will also help to determine if they need the lamp. Huddled under the lamp is usually a sign that it is too cold, all away from the lamp too hot. A good indication that the temperature is right is if the chicks are just even spread out under the lamp. I usually start to turn the lamp off during the day by week 4-6 depending on the weather outside.

I have read that game birds need to be kept in indoor pens until they are fully feathered and mature and then they can placed in outdoor pens.

I have also read that when the game birds don’t need the lamp for heat so much then a 40-60 watt lamp can be placed above the feeders and drinkers to signal for them to eat/drink at night.

Hope this information is useful.
Kind regards
Sara @ farmingfriends

Here is a book about Modern Pheasant Rearing and a book about Modern Partridge Farming:

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If you keep pheasants /partridges or are thinking of keeping pheasants/partridges then join the free farmingfriends game birds forum for the latest chat, advice and questions about pheasants/partridges and game bird related issues.

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Tips On Rearing Partridges

I received an email asking for tips on raising partridges.
Hey I have recently hatched some partridge and after 2 days on the brooder that is homemade they have started to die. I have no idea why, they all started feeding and drinking once put in the brooder. they just seem to lack strength. do you have any tips to raising partridge from a day old? I have done ducks and pheasants before and they were all successful in to adulthood.

Hi Michael,
I had a partridge chick placed in my guinea fowl keet brooder by my father-in-law when I was at work. http://www.farmingfriends.com/theres-an-impostor-in-the-brooder/ The brooder had carpet on the floor so that the chick and keets didn’t get splayed legs. I fed them chick crumbs and gave them shredded lettuce. I placed marbles in the drinker so that the chicks could still have a drink but wouldn’t fall into the water.
I would avoid sawdust/shavings on the floor to begin with as the chicks can often peck the shavings mistaking them for food.
I think that the best litter for the floor is corrugated cardboard with straw on the top.
I hope you find this information useful, if you have any specific questions then let me know. I look forward to hearing more about your partridge.
Kind regards
Sara @ farmingfriends

Here is a book about Modern Partridge Farming:

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If you keep partridges or are thinking of keeping partridges then join the free farmingfriends game birds forum for the latest chat, advice and questions about partridges and game bird related issues.

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Hatching Partridge Eggs

English Partridge are game birds and their eggs take about 23-24 days to hatch out.

Hi, how long does it take for English Partridge to hatch out under a broody bantom? I’ve got 10 eggs off of a friend who has a pair of English Partridge and im going to put them under 1 of my broody hens.
Many Thanks
Scott.

Hi Scott,

Thanks for visiting my website and leaving a comment.

Partridge eggs take 23-24 days to hatch out, but when I am incubating eggs I always leave them for a few days longer, so if the hen is still sitting I would leave them. I believe that when a
hen lays a clutch of eggs the first egg laid will still hatch at around the same time as the last egg laid as the incubation conditions do not begin until the hen begins to sit.

Good luck with your eggs and let me know how you get on. Partridges are great little birds to watch.

Kind regards

Sara

If anyone has any useful information about hatching partridge eggs and particularly English partridge eggs then please leave a comment.

Here is a book about Modern Partridge Farming:

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If you keep partridges or are thinking of keeping partridges then join the free farmingfriends game birds forum for the latest chat, advice and questions about partridges and game bird related issues.

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Rearing Day Old Partridges

I received an email about rearing day old partridges

Rearing English partridge from day old all set to go two questions.
Heat lamp should it be a Red glowing infrared lamp or white.
Why have I been recomended to make sure no daylight is can be seen and for how
long.
These birds are just to be released to the open in a no shooting area.
Cheers
Roger

Hi Roger,

Thank you for visiting my website and leaving this comment.

It is my understanding that a red heat lamp calms down the birds. When I have raised guinea fowl in the past few years I have used a white lamp and this has always been fine. My father in law found a partridge chick one year in the yard so the chick went into the brooder with the guinea fowl chicks and was successfully raised into adulthood when the partridge was then released back into the wild.

When I put quail chicks in the brooder this year I put a red heat lamp as this was recommended in the books I read. As I said it was recommended as the quail are quite skittish and the red light is supposed to keep them calm.

I don’t know why you have been recommended that the birds should not see daylight. May be it is something to do with releasing them back to the wild without having seen the area they are in so that they behave naturally and don’t try to say in the area of the hut that they have been kept in? My partridge was kept in a homemade brooder and saw daylight as all the birds I rear do. I have now got a metal brooder that I line with corrugated card on the sides but the birds still see daylight from the top of the brooder.

I believe that partridges as well as quail don’t stay around if they are allowed to free range but I kept my partridge in a hut with a run on it once it no longer needed the brooder and infact the partridge did free range with the guinea fowl for a while before it just naturally went back to the wild.

I hope this information is useful.
Kind regards
Sara @ farmingfriends

Excellent, thank you for your quick reply. Shall not avoid some daylight as I like you think it is normal.
Cheers Roger

If anyone has any experience of raising dayold English partridges then I would like to hear from you.

Here is a book about Modern Partridge Farming:

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If you keep partridges or are thinking of keeping partridges then join the free farmingfriends game birds forum for the latest chat, advice and questions about partridges and game bird related issues.

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