Splayed Legs In Guinea Fowl Keets

Splayed legs are when a guinea fowl keets legs are not in line correctly but splayed out making movement and standing difficult.

Splayed legs can be the result of the newly hatched keets not being able to get a grip on the floor of the incubator or brooder and as a result the legs will spread out. It can also be caused when their is a good litter on the ground but the keet just struggles to stand due to being weak or because the feet are curled in.

If caught early the splayed legs can be cured by strapping or splinting the legs so that they come back into line. This can be done with pipe cleaners, elastic bands or probably best of all an elastaplast bandaid. A good resource to show this can be found by clicking this link http://www.poultryhelp.com/spraddle.html

In future you can prevent splayed legs by making sure that the litter you are using in your brooder has good traction. I tend to use chopped up straw to start with so that the guinea fowl don’t think that it is food like they do with sawdust.

If you keep guinea fowl and want to ask a question to get some advice or just to chat about your guinea fowl then why not join the free farmingfriends guinea fowl forum.

Front Cover Of Incubating, Hatching & Raising Guinea Fowl Keets An eBook

If you fancy having a go at incubating, hatching and raising guinea fowl keets then check out my Incubating, Hatching & Raising guinea Fowl Keets eBook and if you are in the UK then I also have guinea fowl eggs for hatching for sale (UK Spring and Summer months).

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Curled Toes On Guinea Fowl Keets

On occasions a guinea fowl keet can hatch out with toes that are curled up into a fist shape. Sometimes they may straighten out on their own in the first day or so but if they don’t  you can make a pipe cleaner shoe for the keet to wear which will help to straighten out the toes.

The pipe cleaner needs to be bent into the shape of a keets foot and then attached to the keets foot with a bandaid or elastaplast. Cut three pieces of bandaid to go over all three toes. A larger piece will be needed for the middle toe.

The temporary keet shoe can be kept on for about 8 hours. Remove the shoe and see if the foot has straightened out. If need be the shoe can be refitted to help the keet’s foot get better and allow it to stand properly.

I was recently asked what help could be given to a newly hatched keet with a curled foot.

Gill said that after wearing the keet shoe, “The curled foot is quite good, a little more turned in than the norm but he can now stand properly.”

If you keep guinea fowl and want to ask a question to get some advice or just to chat about your guinea fowl then why not join the free farmingfriends guinea fowl forum.

Front Cover Of Incubating, Hatching & Raising Guinea Fowl Keets An eBook

Guinea Fowl Keets eBook Only

If you fancy having a go at incubating, hatching and raising guinea fowl keets then check out my Incubating, Hatching & Raising guinea Fowl Keets eBook and if you are in the UK then I also have guinea fowl eggs for hatching for sale during the Spring and Summer months.

Guinea Fowl With Leg Problem

Mike from Borneo has some guinea fowl and one seems to have a leg that has reversed itself.

“3 have ‘wonky feet. Once had splayd legs so I tied its legs together with string so that it could walk (sort of). I was then worrried about circulation and found some old ‘chain’ ear rings which I cannibalised so that they became ‘feet shackles’. It seeemd to do the trick and I removed them after a couple of days. It walks ok but has one foot turned out. Anoher keet has slightly inward facing feet but can run quite fast, and one other cant seem to stand up properly (one leg seems very weak), but it scrabbles around. I am going to try bracing the leg so that it is straight……The elastoplast solved the ‘splayed’ legs but now one leg seems to have reversed itself and the keet hobbles around – actually quite fast! The other keet with the weak leg seems to be slowly getting some strength and also moved quickly when startled.”

Mike has sent me some photos.







Mike says that the guinea fowl’s whole leg is dragging behind.

If anyone has come across this leg problem before then please let us know how you dealt with it.

If you keep guinea fowl and want to ask a question to get some advice or just to chat about your guinea fowl then why not join the free farmingfriends guinea fowl forum.

Front Cover Of Incubating, Hatching & Raising Guinea Fowl Keets An eBook

If you fancy having a go at incubating, hatching and raising guinea fowl keets then check out my Incubating, Hatching & Raising guinea Fowl Keets eBook and if you are in the UK then I also have guinea fowl eggs for hatching for sale.

Bumblefoot In Guinea Fowl

Guinea fowl can get bumblefoot. This is when a hard lump forms underneath the foot usually where a small wound has been.

The lump is formed when the infection is still there. Usually you will ntoice the guinea fowl limping before you see the lump.

If the infection is still active the foot will feel hot and swollen and can be treated with an antibiotic treatment.

If the lump is near the surface then you may want to lance the bump and squeeze out the pus and then treat with a veterinary spray.

If you do lance the lump then you may wish to keep the bird away from the other birds as the others will sometimes pick at the wound.

Causes of bumblefoot include:

  • Injury to foot and then becomes infected.
  • Inappropriate perches.
  • Poor hygiene.
  • Poor nutrition.
  • Obesity and inactivity.

One of my guinea fowl recently had bumblefoot. I initially saw that she was limping and then a few days later she had a lump on her foot. I sprayed her foot with an antiseptic spray and the swelling is going down. Guinea fowl can run quickly and fly away if they get frightened. Luckily I managed to steer my guinea fowl into a carrying cage where I was able to spray her foot and not just the air around the guinea fowl!

If you keep guinea fowl and want to ask a question to get some advice or just to chat about your guinea fowl then why not join the free farmingfriends guinea fowl forum.

Front Cover Of Incubating, Hatching & Raising Guinea Fowl Keets An eBook

If you fancy having a go at incubating, hatching and raising guinea fowl keets then check out my Incubating, Hatching & Raising guinea Fowl Keets eBook and if you are in the UK then I also have guinea fowl eggs for hatching for sale (UK Spring and Summer months).

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Guinea Fowl Limping

A few days ago I noticed that one of my guinea fowl hens was limping but then the limp seemed to ease and I thought that the leg injury had cleared up. Tonight as I was rounding the guinea fowl up I noticed again that one of my guinea fowl hens was limping. Upon a closer inspection I noticed that her foot was swollen so it looks like she must have cut her foot a few days ago and there is now an infection and it has swollen up. The swelling is often known as bumblefoot. I will have a look tomorrow at her foot to see if it is still swollen and if it is I will spray it with an antiseptic spray which will be fun as guinea fowl tend to move quickly, even at night, so the blue spray could end up everywhere except on the guinea fowl foot! I’ll let you know how me and the guinea fowl get on!

If you keep guinea fowl and want to ask a question to get some advice or just to chat about your guinea fowl then why not join the free farmingfriends guinea fowl forum.

If you fancy having ago at incubating, hatching and raising guinea fowl keets then check out my Incubating, Hatching & Raising guinea Fowl Keets eBook and if you are in the UK then I also have guinea fowl eggs for hatching for sale.

Coccidiosis In Guinea Fowl

What Is Coccidiosis? 
Coccidiosis is a common parasitic disease of poultry which affects the digestive tract.

Symptoms
Ruffled feathers.
Unthriftiness.
Head drawn back into shoulders.
A chilled appearance.
Thirsty.
Milky white diarrhea which may have blood in it.
If not treated can lead to mortality.
Die at night.

Causes
Coccidiosis is caused by a protozoan parasite (coccidia).
Poultry are exposed to the protozoan parasite via damp conditions, their droppings, dirty drinkers and damp litter in their huts.
Coccidia thrives in damp conditions such as damp litter and is found in guinea fowl droppings.
Coccidia can also be found in water that is not kept clean and free of guinea fowl droppings.
 
Treatment
Separate affected poultry and use medicated feed and water.
Use of coccidiostats.
Prevention
Keeping poultry on a wire floor where their droppings can fall through.
Feeding coccidiostats in the growing diet can help the poultry to build up an immunity to coccidiosis.

Long Beak On Guinea Fowl

does anyone know if guinea fowls beaks can grow too long thus affecting feeding. one of ours looks mangy and has been dewormed, but its beak looks very long and curved – awfully difficult to catch her, any help would be much appreciated. buff

Hi Buff,
Thanks for this question and visiting farmingfriends. I haven’t seen a longer beak in a guinea fowl but I have done in quail. In Michael Roberts book entitled ‘Quail, Past And Present’ he says for quail that “because they are in unnatural surroundings the beak and toe nails can grow very long, but can be trimmed with nail clippers.” I don’t know whether this is the same for guinea fowl but it could be. Obviouslyguinea fowl are alot bigger than quail so catching them and trimming their beak will not be as easy.

You may want to catch your guinea fowl in a cat basket or similar box.You may also want to try to establish a relationship with the guineafowl before you decide to trim the beak so that the guinea fowl trustsyou and won’t struggle so much.

If feeding is difficult I would suggest giving the guinea fowl chopped lettuce, yoghurt, mashed up hard boiled eggs and mashed up layers pellets so that they are easier for the guinea fowl to digest. Hope this information is useful.
Let me know how you get on.
Sara @ farmingfriends

Thanks so much for replying and will try the food you suggest – we have a very, very large garden and at the moment have 3 adults, including the sick one, plus two babies – so they are very protective of each other and very fiesty with any intruders!! Relationship building may take a while although they do follow me and of course love looking in mirrors so may try and lure it into a more confined area that way. Will let you know how things proceed! Thanks again Buff.

If anyone has come across guinea fowl with a long beak then I would like to hear from you.