Will Guinea Fowl Hens Lay Eggs In A Nest Box Or Chicken Coop?

I have been asked if guinea fowl hens lay eggs in a nest box or chicken coop. From my experience the answer is generally no.

I have been keeping and raising guinea fowl for the last 6-7 years and have found that they mainly lay their eggs from midday and early afternoon so they have usually been let out of their hut by the time they want to lay.

If they do lay in the hut they just lay anywhere in the straw and I have never found a guinea fowl egg in the nest boxes I have in their hut.

My guinea fowl free range during the day and roost in a hut at night with some hens, the hens use the nesting boxes but the guinea fowl do not, they will just lay their eggs in the straw. They do like to lay their eggs in the corner of the hut.

Guinea fowl are ground nesting birds and prefer to make their nest in a secluded place usually in a hedgerow in amongst nettles! They scratch the ground out to make a hollow and then lay their eggs. More than one guinea hen will use the same nest.

If you can make a secluded corner of your hut then guinea fowl may lay in their hut. You can encourage them with some pot eggs, but the pot eggs will need to be the same size and colour as their own eggs or they won’t be fooled!

Front Cover Of Incubating, Hatching & Raising Guinea Fowl Keets An eBook

If you fancy having a go at incubating, hatching and raising guinea fowl keets then check out my Incubating, Hatching & Raising guinea Fowl Keets eBook and if you are in the UK then I also have guinea fowl eggs for hatching for sale (UK Spring and Summer months).

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Reasons Why Guinea Fowl Hens May Not Lay Eggs Or Stop Laying Eggs

There are many reasons why guinea fowl hens may stop laying eggs or may not lay eggs.

  1. The age of the guinea fowl hen – as they get older the amount of eggs may reduce.
  2. The health of the guinea fowl hen – illness or parasites can hinder laying.
  3. The time of year – the length of daylight can affect egg production.
  4. Changes in the type of food given – this may cause problems as the nutritional content of the food may vary.
  5. The introduction of new birds to the flock – this may cause undue stress for the guinea fowl hens as they re-establish a pecking order.
  6. Significant changes in routine – can cause stress for the birds.
  7. Housing conditions – unclean, overcrowded, dark and cold conditions can cause stress and or illness which may affect egg production.
  8. Handling and movement of the birds – transporting guinea fowl hens, overhandling, incorrect handling and sudden handling may hinder laying if this causes stress for the birds.
  9. Vermin and predators – the presence of rats, mice, cats, dogs and foxes may frighten the birds or cause undue stress.
  10. Become broody – the guinea fowl hen stops laying because she wants to sit on a nest of eggs and hatch them .

If you keep guinea fowl and want to ask a question to get some advice or just to chat about your guinea fowl then why not join the free farmingfriends guinea fowl forum.

If you fancy having ago at incubating, hatching and raising guinea fowl keets then check out my Incubating, Hatching & Raising guinea Fowl Keets eBook and if you are in the UK then I also have guinea fowl eggs for hatching for sale.

When Do Female Guinea Fowl Start Laying

Female guinea fowl can start laying as early as 16 weeks old. If they reach 16 weeks in the Autumn and Winter months then they usually start to lay in the following Spring, so they can be about 8-10 months old when they start to lay eggs and to breed with their male partners.

In the UK guinea fowl tend to lay between March and September.

They are ground nesting birds and will dig out a bit of a hole in the undergrowth and then start to lay they often share a nest.

Finding the nest can sometimes be hard so observing the birds and watching for males hovering near a patch of nettles in the laying season may be a sign that a nest is not too far away.

If you keep guinea fowl and want to ask a question to get some advice or just to chat about your guinea fowl then why not join the free farmingfriends guinea fowl forum.

Front Cover Of Incubating, Hatching & Raising Guinea Fowl Keets An eBook

If you fancy having a go at incubating, hatching and raising guinea fowl keets then check out my Incubating, Hatching & Raising guinea Fowl Keets eBook and if you are in the UK then I also have guinea fowl eggs for hatching for sale (UK Spring and Summer months).

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If you would like to receive regular information about guinea fowl and poultry then why not sign up to the farmingfriends newsletter.

Click on the image below to visit Amazon.co.uk to find out more about this book or visit one of the Farming Friends Bookshops.

Gardening with Guineas: A Step-By-Step Guide to Raising Guinea Fowl on a Small Scale

Signs That Guinea Fowl Hens Will Lay Eggs

There are certain signs that show that the guinea fowl hen is about to start laying eggs.

  • Visiting the same patch of undergrowth daily.
  • Sitting in a patch of undergrowth for periods of time.
  • Digging a hole in the ground to form a nest area in the undergrowth.
  • Male guinea fowl sitting nearby waiting for the hen.

Once this behaviour is observed, you can watch and wait for the arrival of guinea fowl eggs.

It is important not to disturb the hen when she is on the nest as she may get up without laying. Make sure that the guinea fowl do not see you go near the nest site as this can put them off laying in this area. Collect the eggs when the guinea fowl are not around and try not to disturb the undergrowth as this will indicate to the guinea fowl that a predator has been in the nest area. It is also a good idea to replace the real guinea fowl eggs with a pot or plastic egg so that the guinea fowl will continue to lay in this nest, because if the eggs disappear then the guinea fowl will stop laying in this nest site and will find another area to lay which may take some time to discover.

If you keep guinea fowl and want to ask a question to get some advice or just to chat about your guinea fowl then why not join the free farmingfriends guinea fowl forum.

Front Cover Of Incubating, Hatching & Raising Guinea Fowl Keets An eBook

If you fancy having a go at incubating, hatching and raising guinea fowl keets then check out my Incubating, Hatching & Raising guinea Fowl Keets eBook and if you are in the UK then I also have guinea fowl eggs for hatching for sale (UK Spring and Summer months).

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If you would like to receive regular information about guinea fowl and poultry then why not sign up to the farmingfriends newsletter.

Guinea Fowl Laying Season Begins

Saturday 8th March 2008, saw the guinea fowl egg laying season begin.

I found one guinea fowl egg laid in the paddock. I don’t know if this is where the guinea fowl laid the egg or if a magpie has tried to move the egg but it was certainly an unusual place for the guinea fowl to lay it’s egg as they like to lay their eggs in a dug out ground nest that is covered with foliage or greenery such as a thick patch of nettles.

I will now begin my guinea fowl egg count. Last year I collected 275 guinea fowl eggs but think that I lost over 300 guinea fowl eggs to the magpies. The guinea fowl began laying on the 23rd February 2007 and finished on the 20th September 2007.

My guinea fowl free range and so finding their nest sites is not easy. I have to watch their movements carefully so that I can track down their eggs and I also need to make sure that I get their before the magpies who are partial to stealing guinea fowl eggs. We currently have about 6 magpies in and around our farm. I will let you know when I find the official guinea fowl nesting site.