Training Guinea Fowl To Roost In A Hut At Night

I free range my guinea fowl during the day and then put them in a hut to roost at night although guinea fowl will naturally roost in trees if you don’t train them to go in a hut.

I like mine to go in a hut at night so that they are protected from predators such as the fox and that they are also sheltered from the weather.

I use long sticks to drive my guinea fowl in the direction I want then to go. If the sticks get too close to the guinea fowl it spooks them and they fly up into the trees. Long sticks for driving the guinea fowl into a certain area can be helpful, but a word of warning don’t wave the sticks too close to the guinea fowl as this will frighten them and send them flying into the trees.

I tend to use a stick in each hand as an extension of my arm so that I can dirst the guinea fowl flock in the direction I want them to go.

Feeding them in the hut at the end of the day will also help them to return to the hut. They get used to the routine of their food being in the hut and will head back to the food source. I would introduce the hut with some food that the guinea fowl are really fond of. Mine love lettuce and apples. If you can get the guinea fowl to get used to a place and think of it as a place where they get something that they like then they will relate to this.

Training the guinea fowl to go into the hut will take some time and effort, you will need to go out at the same time each day so that the birds get used to the routine as they are creatures of habit and will range the same area day in and day out. I have found that guinea fowl have a route which they take every day and they are creatures of habit and can usually be found in the same place at the same time each day so your guinea fowl will establish them selves a routine in their enclosure.

After a few weeks of walking the guinea fowl to their hut they will get used to the routine.

Eventually the guinea fowl will return to the hut on their own and sometimes will even go into the hut on their own, but this is not always the case, as sometimes if left too late they will fly up to the roof of the barn or into the trees in the orchard timing needs to be just right.

Guinea fowl tend to want to roost earlier than hens in the Autumn/winter seasons and later than hens in the Spring and summer.

From experience I have found that it is definately possible to train guinea fowl to go into a hut and I have also had experience of moving the hut and the guinea fowl do then re-adjust to the new location, although it does take them a few days of re-training to get them to naturally know where they are going.

Front Cover Of Incubating, Hatching & Raising Guinea Fowl Keets An eBook

If you fancy having a go at incubating, hatching and raising guinea fowl keets then check out my Incubating, Hatching & Raising guinea Fowl Keets eBook and if you are in the UK then I also have guinea fowl eggs for hatching for sale (UK Spring and Summer months).

If you would like to receive regular information about guinea fowl and poultry then why not sign up to the farmingfriends newsletter.

If you keep guinea fowl and want to ask a question to get some advice or just to chat about your guinea fowl then why not join the free farmingfriends guinea fowl forum.

Visit Wells Poultry For All Your Poultry Equipment & Housing

Enter your email address to receive regular email updates of the farmingfriends website posts:

Delivered by FeedBurner


Guinea Fowl Hen Sitting On Nest Of Eggs And Hatching Keets

I recently received a comment asking about the management of guinea fowl hen sitting on her eggs and the keets that hatch out.

Hi,
We have a guinea fowl in our garden who has been sitting on her eggs for a long time now and some of them hatched this morning. We built a shelter around her from wire and she hasn’t moved from her nest. Do you think this will be ok for the keets to survive? Does she need to be able to get on and off the nest and wonder around; or do we need to leave food in the enclosure for her and her keets?
Thanks
Bob


My repsonse was:

Hi Bob,
Thanks for contacting farmingfriends and telling me about your guinea fowl. Congratulations on the hatch. Your guinea may not have moved because not all the eggs may have hatched yet and she will be waiting for the others to hatch.
Make sure that the shelter is predator proof and has an area where the keets can shelter from the elements (wind, rain or snow!) Also make sure that the wire is small enough so that the keets can’t get through the wire or rats can’t get in as rats, mink, stoats would get in and kill the keets. I would make sure that their is food and water in the enlosure. The keets will need chick crumbs and make sure that they cannot drown in the drinker, I usually add marbles or pebbles to the drinker so that the keets can still drink the water but can’t immerse their head in it.
Sitting birds may come off the nest once or twice a day to drink, eat and stretch their legs but if she is in the final stages of sitting then she may not.
Once all the eggs have hatched or the guinea fowl leaves the nest and the remaining eggs are not going to hatch the the guinea fowl should show the keets how to drink and feed although they will do this instinctively if the food and water is placed close enough to them.
I hope all the hatchlings are doing well and that the rest hatch soon. Keep me posted. Where in the world are you? I am based in Yorkshire in the UK.
Just to let you know I have a free forum with a section on guinea fowl http://farmingfriends.com/forums/forum.php?id=6
I have also written an eBook about incubating, hatching and raising guinea fowl keets, it mainly discusses incubating the eggs in an incubator as opposed to a guinea fowl hen sitting but also discusses raising the keets to 6/8 weeks.

http://farmingfriends.com/incubating-hatching-and-raising-guinea-fowl-keets-ebook-for-sale/

Kind regards
sara @ farmingfriends

If you have any advice for Bob about a sitting guinea fowl and then raising the keets with the guinea fowl hen then please leave a comment.

If you keep guinea fowl and want to ask a question to get some advice or just to chat about your guinea fowl then why not join the free farmingfriends guinea fowl forum.

Front Cover Of Incubating, Hatching & Raising Guinea Fowl Keets An eBook

 

If you fancy having a go at incubating, hatching and raising guinea fowl keets then check out my Incubating, Hatching & Raising guinea Fowl Keets eBook and if you are in the UK then I also have guinea fowl eggs for hatching for sale (UK Spring and Summer months).

Enter your email address: Delivered by FeedBurner


Water For Guinea Fowl

I have been asked if guinea fowl can drink out of a stream.

Guinea fowl drink water but can go for quite long periods of time without water as they originate from a hot, dry country.

When guinea fowl free range they will happily drink water where ever they can find it, so I would assume that they would drink water from a stream if they were able to get close to the edge of the stream.

If you have experience of guinea fowl drinking from a stream then please let us know.

If you keep guinea fowl and want to ask a question to get some advice or just to chat about your guinea fowl then why not join the free farmingfriends guinea fowl forum.

Front Cover Of Incubating, Hatching & Raising Guinea Fowl Keets An eBook

If you fancy having a go at incubating, hatching and raising guinea fowl keets then check out my Incubating, Hatching & Raising guinea Fowl Keets eBook and if you are in the UK then I also have guinea fowl eggs for hatching for sale.


Guinea Fowl Calling Out

On Monday night I rounded up my guinea fowl, hens and ducks into the poultry hut.

The hens are the easiest to get in as they want to go in earlier than all the rest and are very friendly and come running up to me when they see me so when I go out to do my nightly round up of the poultry the hens just follow me to the hut.

The ducks also come to the hut when I call them and usually manage to go straight in although I do have to keep my distance otherwise we do a couple of circuits around the hut.

During the Summer months the guinea fowl hang about in small mating groups and all have their own routine and route during the day so can be in different places at night. I have a special call which brings the guinea fowl to the hut and then I count them in. If the guineas don’t respond to the call then I go and round them up and drive them to the hut with some long sticks.

On Monday night I got the hens and ducks in without a problem and then I counted in 21 guinea fowl. 7 guineas were somewhere on the farm so I went to locate them. I found them way down the back field so I thought that I would go to feed the pigs whilst they walked closer to the hut.

After feeding the pigs I headed in. Haven’t you forgotten something I hear you cry now.  I was watching TV for a while and then just as I was sitting down to have tea I heard the guinea fowl calling out.

“The guinea fowl are loud, I wonder what’s the matter with them, you don’t usually hear them that loud, ” I said to my husband. His reply was,

“Have you left a guinea out?”

With that the memory of 7 guinea fowl wandering about the back field came back to me so out I dashed. By this time the guinea fowl had come up to the hut and were standing in the middle of the orchard calling out. When I approached and spoak to them in a soothing way they stopped calling out. I am convined they were calling out to me to tell me I had forgotten them and they went into the hut without another squawk!

If you keep guinea fowl and want to ask a question to get some advice or just to chat about your guinea fowl then why not join the free farmingfriends guinea fowl forum.

If you fancy having ago at incubating, hatching and raising guinea fowl keets then check out my Incubating, Hatching & Raising guinea Fowl Keets eBook and if you are in the UK then I also have guinea fowl eggs for hatching for sale.


Ways To Start Rearing Guinea Fowl

There are a number of ways you can start rearing guinea fowl.
1) Buy hatching eggs and incubate them or get a broody hen to incubate them.
2) Buy day old keets and raise them.
3) Buy guinea fowl poults from about 6 weeks old and raise them.
4) Buy sexed adult guinea fowl from 12 weeks onwards.
An excellent book is Guinea Fowl Past & Present by Michael Roberts, here is my review of the book.
Another great book is Gardening with Guineas by Jeanette S. Ferguson
Gardening with Guineas: A Step-By-Step Guide to Raising Guinea Fowl on a Small Scale

Click on this link for selected books from Amazon on guinea fowl.

I have a category specifically about guinea fowl and I have a forum which is free to join and members can chat and ask questions about guinea fowl.


How To Stop Guinea Fowl Straying Onto The Road

I am afraid that the guinea fowl need to be trained not to go on or near the road. The guinea fowl can be trained but it may take some time to break the habit as guinea fowl are creatures of routine and tend to follow set routes around the garden each day.
When you see the guinea fowl ranging near the road, it is best to go out and steer them back into your garden. Long sticks for driving the guinea fowl into a certain area can be helpful, but a word of warning don’t wave the sticks too close to the guinea fowl as this will frighten them and send them flying into the trees.

Obviously going out each time the guinea fowl go near the road will be time consuming, so I would try enticing the guinea fowl back into the area that you want them to range in, with some millet. Jeannette Ferguson’s book Gardening with Guineas suggests that if you sprinkle the millet near a flower bed then the guinea fowl will eat the millet and hopefully notice all the bugs in the flower bed that they enjoy eating.
I am sorry that I don’t have a quick fix to stopping your guinea fowl from straying onto the road but hopefully with some training your guinea fowl will learn to stay within the area you train them to range in, thus keeping them safe and all the bugs and pests that eat your flowers will be eaten by the guinea fowl. It sounds like a win, win situation!

Click on the image below to visit Amazon.co.uk to find out more about this book or visit one of the Farming Friends Bookshops.

Gardening with Guineas: A Step-By-Step Guide to Raising Guinea Fowl on a Small Scale


Guinea Fowl Keets Pasting Up

Pasting up on keets is when the keets droppings get attached to the vent area which if not dealt with can quickly form into large clumps. If the clumps are not removed the keets will not be able to pass their droppings from their body and this can result in the keets dying.

Pasting Up On A Guinea Fowl Keet

Pasting Up On A Guinea Fowl Keet

Three of the nine guinea fowl keets from the last hatch became pasted up and although I removed the attached clumps from the three keets, only two of the keets have survived. I feel so sorry for this poor little keet.

It is very important to regularly check the keet’s vents are not pasting up and re check once clump are removed that the pasting up does not recurr. I have found that if you do not remove all of the droppings then the pasting up often returns.

Signs to look out for.

  • Droppings attached to the vent.
  • Keet walking uncomfortably.
  • Droopy and tired looking keets.
  • Smaller body size in comparison to keets of the same age.
  • Wings becoming too big for body size.
  • Keet pecking at vent area.

Pasting up can be fatal so it is important to be vigilant not only in the first few weeks but for the first six weeks of the keets life.

Front Cover Of Incubating, Hatching & Raising Guinea Fowl Keets An eBook

If you fancy having a go at incubating, hatching and raising guinea fowl keets then check out my Incubating, Hatching & Raising guinea Fowl Keets eBook and if you are in the UK then I also have guinea fowl eggs for hatching for sale (UK Spring and Summer months).

If you would like to receive regular information about guinea fowl and poultry then why not sign up to the farmingfriends newsletter.

If you keep guinea fowl and want to ask a question to get some advice or just to chat about your guinea fowl then why not join the free farmingfriends guinea fowl forum.

Enter your email address to receive regular email updates of the farmingfriends website posts:

Delivered by FeedBurner


Feeding Guinea Fowl

Diana The Guinea Fowl Hen

My guinea fowl feed daily on a mix of;

  • layers pellets &
  • wheat
freeranginguineas2.jpg

When they free range they also eat;

  • apples
  • sugar beet
  • fodder beet
  • seeds
  • nettles
  • grass
  • insects
  • berries
  • grain

I have found that my guinea fowl like to feed in the open so that they can flock together.

freerangingguineas.jpg

When they wander into the vegetable garden they like to eat;

  • lettuce
  • cabbage &
  • runner beans
100_0215.jpg

Guinea fowl keets (chicks) eat;

  • chick crumbs &
  • they love lettuce

 

  1. You will find free information that states the housing and nutritional requirements of guinea fowl at www.guineafowl.com/fritsfarm/guineas

    You might also be interested in the GFBA, an international association of people interested in learning accurate information about raising and keeping guinea fowl. See www.gfba.org for details.

    Our internet group would love to hear about guineas in your country and how you manage to keep from losing them to predators when they roost in trees and live outside 24/7. Please visit us at www.guineafowl.com/board and tell us more about how you raise your guineas.

    Comment by GFBA – April 6, 2007 @ 1:43 pm

  2. Hi GFBA,

    Thanks for passing this information onto my readers. When I first got guinea fowl I read all about guinea fowl on the fritsfarm website and that inspired me to set up a site for the British guinea fowl enthusiast.

    Thanks for taking the time to leave this comment.

    Sara @ Farming Friends

    Comment by Sara @ Farming Friends – April 6, 2007 @ 2:13 pm

  3. We are investigating setting up a an enterprise rearing Guinea Fowl at the end of this year.
    We have had many years of expereince rearing pheasants and partridge, and have kept ducks, and peacocks. So most is not new to us, but we welcome any advice for our venture from anyone, plus information on where we can buy keets, to start us off.

    Penny

    Comment by penny green – February 3, 2008 @ 11:00 am

  4. Hi Penny,

    I am currently writing an e-book on raising guinea fowl which will be available soon – I will let you know when. In the meantime my guinea fowl category has lots of information about keeping guinea fowl.

    Can I ask how many keets you are wanting to set up with as I may be able to hatch the keets for you or know someone who can depending on the numbers?

    If you email me specific questions I will try to answer them for you, so don’t hesitate to ask any question relating to guinea fowl rearing.

    I look forward to hearing from you.

    Sara @ farmingfriends

    Comment by Sara @ Farming Friends – February 4, 2008 @ 3:37 pm

  5. I unexpectedly received 25 guinea keets as a birthday present (I only desired two or three to keep the single guinea company on this farm since I know they tend to herd). I am not a guinea farmer and even have a hard time keeping the cat population from exploding. At any rate, the farmer I rent my home from let me use a 8×4 pen to keep them in and that seemed fine for a while. Started feeding them crushed corn on the first day and after asking folks I bought them 25 lbs “start and grow”, sometimes mixed with a bit of crushed corn. when they ran out of that I bought them some turkey feed (higher protein they say) and it sure smelled and felt richer than the start and grow. In the meantime I pulled up grass and vegetation to give them exceptng the poision oak/ivy/sumac stuff and i found that they love fishing worms and crickets. This farmer grows milo and I wasnt sure if i could just cut it off the stalk and give it to them. Oh… soon after the 8×4 cage with 25 guineas i moved them to a much larger half barn/half chicken wire type cage because i felt like they needed space. Still feeding combo of crushed corn and turkey feed… sometimes worms (i can buy those but have a hard time catching crickets). Recently we had a hurricane here (i live in Rosenberg, Texas with hurricane Ike) The hurricane tore up their home but they all survived and were still somewhat “pent up” . They look so skinny and miserable when wet. I repaired the perimeter but not the roof of this pen thinking they would not fly out while I was tending the disaster in my yard and the neighboring farmers yard but they did. I kept track of them since i thought it impossible to catch them one by one by hand. They stayed in an old one-row 1950′s cotton picker in the farmers field not far from their original home. Next morning or so I found them roaming the grounds and was happy to see ALL of them together and fed them their usual crushed corn and turkey feed in a large pan (they attacked it). The farmer’s son said they were too young to avoid predators and that we should keep them pent till they were older so we labored over repairing this barn/pen and I was wildly surprised at how easy it was for us to herd them (slowly and easily with surprisingly little difficulty) back into their home. I am anxious to let them roam the plenty room they have here. They are just starting to make the guinea noises instead of the “beep-beep” and I dont want them to be frustrated in this cage. There is a small trap door in this cage (the old farmer says open it in the morning and they will find their way dont force them and perhaps they will come in to roost at night). I have put up plenty of roosting places for them and was pleased to see them using these expensive 1-1/4diameter x 8′ poles i bought from lowes. I put them up as soon as I moved them to the larger pen and they stay there every night. The ground in their pen is bare, i bring vegetation, and now that on this site i see perhaps they like lettuce i will feed them that for sure and hope to soon let them out. I hate to lose them to predators. The farmer here has a hard time keeping chickens due to (im not sure if coyotes or wolves or the difference) but i do know that this single adult female guinea (she lays eggs and says “buckwheat-buckwheat) has survived the whole time ive been here. My original intent was two or three guineas to keep this one company (my mother lives next to a farmer who keeps guineas, peacocks, cows, asses, you name it, and hence the birthday present) so I hope to let them loose soon because I think it unnatural to keep them pent up. Nice site, and yes I like to “Meet the animals, harvest the information….” but I dont mind getting my hands dirty.

    Thanks for the information. They really love crickets, but crickets are so hard to catch.

    robert

    Comment by robert vaughan – September 16, 2008 @ 11:57 pm

  6. I have a big open field, and catch grasshoppers for my guinea hens. They go nuts, and jump into my lap to feed on them!

    Comment by Tom Lawler – October 26, 2008 @ 7:14 pm


Guinea Fowl Do Not Like Snow – They Think It’s Foul!!

December 2005 -  I had a bit of a problem today when I tried to put the guinea fowl back in their huts. They do not like to stand and walk in the snow which has arrived just a little late to make it a white Christmas. Typical! This snow was going to be a big problem to me as the ground was heavily carpetted and the poultry huts were surrounded.There was no way of reaching the huts without putting your foot in it! 

When I herded the guinea fowl towards their huts, they kept flying back to the dry land they had found! Not that I blame them – if I’d originated from Africa, I don’t think I would like the snow either!

Eventually I managed to get the poults (young guinea fowl) and Hatty the Hen into their huts but the adult guinea fowl (the royal trio!) have a mind of their own. They decided to fly up into the trees in the orchard and roost there for the night. Oh well, they’ve roosted over night in the trees before, so I’m sure they’ll be ok.

 

This is Charlie roosting in the trees in the Orchard to get away from the snow!

This is Charlie roosting in the trees in the Orchard to get away from the snow!

The next day came and there was still no sign of the snow melting. Charlie, Camilla and Diana were happily perched above the snowy carpet surveying their kingdom. They don’t seem to want to come down. Well, we certainly know who the boss is and it’s not me!

I decided not to get the others out, as I felt sure they would join the royal trio.

Great news! When I returned later in the day to check on the poultry, the females, Camilla and Diana, had flown down and were proudly sitting on top of their run. Lets hope I can manage to coax them back into the warmth of their hut. We’ll see who’s the boss now……..no, it’s still not me, they’ve flown back up to join Charlie. I’m just going to have to wait for the snow to melt.

As New Year’s Eve dawned, the snow was melting fast and the roosting trio had finally decided to descend from the trees and were now ready to go back in, thank goodness! I bet the guinea fowl’s New Year’s Resolution was to avoid snow at all cost. I’m sure they think the snow is foul!

If you keep guinea fowl and want to ask a question to get some advice or just to chat about your guinea fowl then why not join the free farmingfriends guinea fowl forum.

Front Cover Of Incubating, Hatching & Raising Guinea Fowl Keets An eBook

If you fancy having a go at incubating, hatching and raising guinea fowl keets then check out my Incubating, Hatching & Raising guinea Fowl Keets eBook and if you are in the UK then I also have guinea fowl eggs for hatching for sale (UK Spring and Summer months).

If you would like to receive regular information about guinea fowl and poultry then why not sign up to the farmingfriends newsletter.