12 Egg Poultry Incubator For Sale

Just wanted to let you know that farmingfriends has now added the 12 egg poultry incubator to the farmingfriends shop.

 WATCH THE VIDEO OF THE INCUBATOR AND READ OUR EXPERIENCES

There is a lower basin within the incubator to hold the  water to control the humidity and the temperature control is fully automatic and contolled by a thermostat. The incubator also has a thermometer attached to read temperature inside the incubator. The light stays on while heating up to 100 deg F. After that the light bulb will flash.  Approximate capacity for the incubator is 12 hen eggs, 6 duck eggs, 4 – 6 turkey or goose, 20+  quail or partridge eggs & 15+ guinea fowl or pheasant eggs.

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Some useful books when starting out with incubating and hatching poultry eggs include Incubation At Home By Michael Roberts and Incubation: A Guide To Hatching And Rearing By Katie Thear.

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Advice About Incubating Chukar Partridge Eggs

I have been asked for advice about incubating chukar partridge eggs.

Hi all, I am new at this forum and almost as new with raising Chukar partridges. I live in Australia and we dont have alot of info or support with regards to getting Chukar out and about! Hope someone can help
Have 6 pairs of adults have been incubating the eggs for the past few months in a Brinsea fully automatic incubator and then transferring them into a manual tray incubator at day 19. Have altered the temp and humidity so many times, each batch gets 99.5F and different humidity %. Using a dry bulb thermometer. Nothing is yielding good success. We started off with temp at about 99.5F and humidity at 50%. Then kept temp the same and bumped up humidity we are now at 65% for the first 19 days and last 3 its over 70%. Poor success rates and not one has pipped and hatched on their own. They seem to still grow too big for the egg so cant break out of the shell. They also get stuck from the ‘stuff’ in the egg and we end up helping to peel away the shell, sometimes they bleed a bit. Those that we help generally survive and thrive, but its such a hard distressing thing to do and to watch them suffer.
Can anyone give me any advice everything i read conflicts everything else. What am i doing wrong?

Cheers Tania

Hi Tania,
Welcome to the farmingfriends forum.

I have not hatched partridges and only raised one partridge from a few days old when my fatherinlaw found the partridge chick in the farm yard and no sign of the mother.
Here is a link to reasons why they don’t hatch on own http://farmingfriends.com/reasons-why-fully-formed-chicks-may-not-hatch-out/
Reasons for pipped eggs but not hatching http://farmingfriends.com/reasons-for-pipped-eggs-but-chicks-not-hatched/
Here’s the info about hatching that I have on incubating chukar eggs http://farmingfriends.com/incubating-chukar-partridge-eggs/

Incubation Period – The incubation period for chukar partridge eggs is 23-24 days.

Incubation Temperature – The temperature in the incubator for chukar partridge eggs is 99.5 degrees fahrenheit.

Humidity Levels – The humidity level (wet bulb thermometer) for chukar partridge eggs is 80-88 degrees fahrenheit.

Final Day Of Egg Rotation – The final day of egg rotation for chukar partridge eggs is day 21.

I have a book Modern Partridge farming and I will see if there is any info in this about chukar partridges.

Do you place water in the incubator throughout the incubation period?

Hope we can help you get your hatching rates to improve. I will do some research in the next few days.
Kind regards
Sara @ farmingfriends

If you have any advice for Tania about hatching chukar partridge eggs then please leave a comment below or alternatively leave a comment on the forum discussion about incubating chukar partridge eggs.

Here is a book about Modern Partridge Farming:

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If you keep partridges or are thinking of keeping partridges then join the free farmingfriends game birds forum for the latest chat, advice and questions about partridges and game bird related issues.

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Should You Wash Eggs Before Incubating?

I am often asked if you should wash eggs before incubating and there is a debate as to whether you should or not.

Many poultry/waterfowl/gamebird breeders don’t think you should wash them:

* If you wash them you can wash bacteria into the egg as the shells are porous. It is not advisable to wash eggs before incubating as bacteria can be transferred into the egg which can affect the growth and development of the chick/duckling, cause illness, defects in the chicks or even chicks not hatching.

Eggs have a protective coating and if you wash them or rub them then you may remove the protective coating.

Here are some tips on storing and choosing eggs before incubation http://farmingfriends.com/choosing-and-storing-eggs-before-incubation/

http://farmingfriends.com/cleaning-eggs-for-the-incubator/

Some people do say that you can wash eggs and they say if cleaning eggs then use water that is warmer than the egg.

I have had a look in my copy of incubation at home by Micheal Roberts. http://farmingfriends.com/shop/poultry-books/incubation-at-home-by-michael-roberts/ He is an advocate of not washing, but says if you have dirty eggs then you could scrape off the soil/muck with a clean kitchen scourer. He also mentions Virkon which I believe is a sanitiser and washing in water that is 35 degrees..

I have had a look at my copy of Incubation: A Guide To Hatching & Rearing by Katie Thear http://farmingfriends.com/shop/poultry-books/incubation-a-guide-to-hatching-and-rearing-book-by-katie-thear/ and she suggests brushing them clean with a dry nail brush. She also mentions washing the eggs in water warmer than the egg which has had a sanitiser added.

Some people do wash eggs before incubation.
If you are going to wash the eggs then wash them in warm water, dry, then wipe with a special disinfectant. The water needs to be warmer than the egg so that the dirt doesn’t get through the porous shell and don’t rub too hard as this will rub off the protective layer on the shell.

What is your opinion? Can eggs be washed before incubation?

If you keep poultry or are interested in keeping poultry then visit the farmingfriends forum for the latest chat.

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Incubator Schemes For Schools

Had a really interesting enquiry today asking if I did an incubator scheme for schools. Thanks Belinda for making me aware of these schemes because as a former teacher I think that they are a great idea.

Incubator Schemes involve providing schools with an incubator and fertile hen or duck eggs for hatching. I have found a number of these schemes running in the UK:

Living Eggs – They run this a programme all over the country but it doesn’t say if the scheme is free.

Acorn Farm, part of Knowsley  Cost is £80 plus delivery fee.

Deen City Farm Incubator Scheme – based in London borough of Merton but deliver else where. The cost is over £100.

The Hatch Factor –  based in Devonshire, doesn’t say if  they deliver all over the country but are free of charge.

Incubator Hygiene

Incubator hygiene is very important for the success rate of the hatching eggs.

I have finished using the incubator this year so it is important that I make sure that the incubator is thoroughly cleaned and disinfected before it is stored away.

This is one job I never really enjoy. I try to do it as soon as the last set of chicks are taken from the incubator as any remaining water begins to stagnate and smell if not cleaned out quickly.

Putting the incubator away clean makes the job of cleaning and disinfecting the incubator alot easier when it is time to prepare the incubator for incubation.

Candling Eggs

What is Candling?

Candling is a way of checking the fertility of an egg and the development of the embryo, with the use of a light source in a darkened room. In a darkened room, carefully hold the egg up to the light to observe the contents of the egg.

Candling Results

The embryo is located at the large end of the egg, where blood vessels will be present under the surface if the egg is fertile. The embryo appears as a dark spot which becomes larger as the incubation period continues.

  • Fertile egg – the egg will appear to have a black spot which as the embryo grows and incubation continues will grow larger until light will only pass through the air cell end of the egg.
  • Infertile egg – eggs appear clear.
  • Dead embryo – if the egg was fertile but the embryo has died then you will see a blood ring around the yolk or possibly a dark spot dried to the inside of the shell depending on when the embryo stopped growing.

Note that dark or brown shelled eggs are more difficult to candle than white or pale shelled eggs.

When To Candle

Candling can be done at any time, although day 8 onwards is usually when the embryo is more easily identified.

  1. Day 3 of incubation (usually pale shelled eggs).
  2. Day 5/6 of incubation (usually dark shelled eggs).
  3. Between day 8 – 12 of incubation (embryo more easily identified).
  4. 3 days prior to hatching.

Why Candle

  • To remove infertile eggs or eggs with a dead embryo so that the incubator does not become contaminated.

Candling Equipment

  1. A torch with a lense the size of a small coin may be used.
  2. A commercial candler may be purchased.
  3. A homemade candler which uses a bulb or torch placed in a container with a small hole to let the light pass through.

Remember that if you decide to candle your eggs, make sure that you handle the eggs carefully and only take them out of the incubator for a short time.

Check out the following books about incubating and hatching eggs.

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Humidity Levels For Egg Incubation

Different species of birds’ eggs require different humidity levels when being incubated.

Guinea Fowl Eggs In Incubator

Guinea Fowl Eggs In Incubator

Here is a guide to the humidity levels (wet bulb thermometer) for different species of birds’ eggs.

Bobwhite Quail = 84-86 degrees fahrenheit.

Canada Goose = 86-88 degrees fahrenheit.

Chicken = 85-87 degrees fahrenheit.

Chukar Partridge = 80-88 degrees fahrenheit.

Cotumix (Japanese) Quail = 84-88 degrees fahrenheit.

Duck = 84-88 degrees fahrenheit.

Egyptian Goose = 86-88 degrees fahrenheit.

Emu = 70-75 degrees fahrenheit.

Goose = 86-88 degrees fahrenheit.

Grouse = 82-86 degrees fahrenheit.

Guinea Fowl = 83-86 degrees fahrenheit.

Indian Runner Duck = 84-88 degrees fahrenheit.

Mallard =  84-88 degrees fahrenheit.

Muscovy Duck = 84-88 degrees fahrenheit.

Ostrich = 70-75 degrees fahrenheit.

Partridge = 80-88 degrees fahrenheit.

Peafowl = 83-88 degrees fahrenheit.

Pheasant = 82-88 degrees fahrenheit.

Pigeon = 84-88 degrees fahrenheit.

Rheas = 80-87 degrees fahrenheit.

Swan = 86-88 degrees fahrenheit.

Turkey = 83-86 degrees fahrenheit.

Please note that these humidity levels are approximate and may differ according to the incubator manufacturer’s guide.

Always consult the manufacturer’s guide when using an incubator.

If you keep poultry or are thinking of keeping poultry and want to ask a question to get some advice or just to chat about incubating and hatching poultry then why not join the free farmingfriends forum.

Check out the following books about incubating and hatching.

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If you would like to receive regular information about poultry then why not sign up to the farmingfriends newsletter.

Choosing And Storing Eggs Before Incubation

Before Incubation

It is important for eggs that are not to be incubated straight away to be stored correctly.

The Eggs

  • Cracked, poorly shaped, soiled, thin shelled, unusually large or unusually small eggs should not be kept for incubation.
  • Only select clean and undamaged eggs for incubation.
  • Eggs should not be washed.
  • Try not to handle the eggs too frequently.
  • When handling eggs make sure that hands are washed to avoid bacterial contamination.
  • Before incubation eggs can be stored for up to 7 days.
  • When storing eggs before incubating, make sure that they are kept at a constant temperature of 13-18 degrees Celsius or 55-65 degrees Fahrenheit.
  • Do not store the eggs at ordinary room temperature or in a refrigerator.
  • Avoid placing the eggs in a draft when in storage before incubation.
  • Store eggs with the small end facing down.
  • Try to keep the eggs at the correct humidity prior to incubation which is a humidity of 70-80%.
  • Make sure the stored eggs are turned twice daily before they are incubated.
  • Keep the stored eggs in an egg carton and prop up one end at a 35 degree angle.


Check out the following books about incubating and hatching eggs.

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If you would like to receive regular information about poultry then why not sign up to the farmingfriends newsletter.

Incubation Periods For Different Species Of Birds’ Eggs

Different species of birds’ eggs require different lengths of incubation time.

Here is a guide to the incubation period for different species of birds’ eggs.

Bobwhite Quail = 23-24 days

Canada Goose = 35 days

Chicken = 21 days

Chukar Partridge = 23-24 days

Cotumix (Japanese) Quail = 17 days

Duck = 28 days

Egyptian Goose = 35 days

Emu = 43-50 days

Goose = 30 days

Grouse = 25 days

Guinea Fowl = 28 days

Indian Runner Duck = 28 and a half days

Mallard = 26 and a half-27 days

Muscovy Duck = 35-37 days

Ostrich = 42-48 days

Partridge = 23-24 days

Peafowl = 28-30 days

Pheasant = 23-28 days

Pigeon = 17 days

Rheas = 35-40 days

Turkey = 28 days

Please note that this is only a guide and this information may differ according to the incubator manufacturer’s guide.

Always consult the manufacturer’s guide when using an incubator

Click on the image below to go to Amazon.co.uk to find out more about this book.

Incubation: A Guide to Hatching and Rearing