Ways To Hatch Guinea Fowl Eggs

There are 3 ways to hatch guinea fowl eggs:

1) In an incubator.
2) Under a guinea fowl hen.
3) With a broody bantam hen.

I was reminded of this the other day when I had an email from anne saying that she was going to try all three methods.

Here are some things to consider.

With the eggs in the incubator watch the humidity levels as the egg shells are so hard that it makes it difficult for the guinea fowl to break through.

With the nesting guinea hen it’s making sure she sits in a place safe from predators and is not disturbed as guinea fowl can abandon nests.

With a broody bantam I know that this method produces good results as some friends have had guinea fowl eggs from me and their bantams and silkies have sat on the eggs, hatched them and raised the guinea fowl being excellent mothers to the keets. Once the hen has gone broody you can slip the guinea fowl eggs into her nest for her to sit on and hatch.

Front Cover Of Incubating, Hatching & Raising Guinea Fowl Keets An eBook

If you fancy having a go at incubating, hatching and raising guinea fowl keets then check out my Incubating, Hatching & Raising guinea Fowl Keets eBook and if you are in the UK then I also have guinea fowl eggs for hatching for sale (UK Spring and Summer months).

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If you keep guinea fowl and want to ask a question to get some advice or just to chat about your guinea fowl then why not join the free farmingfriends guinea fowl forum.

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Fluctuating Temperature In Egg Hatching Incubator

I have received an email from Jenny asking for help regarding the temperature fluctuating in her incubator.

Hello,

My name is Jenny, I have an incubutor.. but I can not get it to hold it’s temperature… it’s up and down like a yo yo..

Can you help? I have now tried it twice and got nothing each time.

Regards Jenny

Hi Jenny,

Sorry to hear that your incubator temperature is fluctuating. Where do you have your incubator positioned? Incubators are most reliable if kept in a room with a constant temperature. The kitchen is not a good place fot an incubator as the fluctuating heat as the oven is used can affect the incubator. The incubator needs to be kept away from draughts and also away from a window where the sunlight can warm up the incubator in the day and then the incubator will get colder at night.

I have read that “The bulb of the thermometer may be placed inside a blob of Plasticine or similar to reduce changes in readings due to minor fluctuations and give an average reading.”

Is the thermometer working correctly? Can you check it against another thermometer? New thermometers should be checked against one known to be accurate.

Do you have the thermometer placed near the eggs? In a still air incubator the temperature varies vertically within the incubator and there may be a difference of several degrees between the bottom and the top of the incubator. The temperature should be kept at that required by the eggs at the level at which the eggs are kept. In order to monitor this, a thermometer should be placed at the same level as the eggs.

I am sure that you are aware that the temperature will alter when you open up the incubator, the temperature will fall when the door is opened to add, remove or manipulate eggs. So turning the eggs needs to be done quickly and carefully.

For normal development and good hatchability, eggs must be maintained within a narrow temperature range. Both too high and too low temperatures maycause problems with the hatch.

Here are some useful links regarding reasons for problems with hatching:
Reasons for a poor hatch rate or no hatching eggs in an incubator
Reasons for eggs hatching late
Reasons for pipped eggs but chicks not hatched
Reasons why fully formed chicks may not hatch out

Hope you can get your incubator to give you good results. Good luck with future hatching.
Kind regards
sara @ farmingfriends

Do you have any tips for Jenny to help her regulate the temperature in her incubator?

If you keep poultry or are interested in keeping poultry then visit the farmingfriends forum for the latest chat.

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12 Egg Poultry Incubator For Sale

Just wanted to let you know that farmingfriends has now added the 12 egg poultry incubator to the farmingfriends shop.

 WATCH THE VIDEO OF THE INCUBATOR AND READ OUR EXPERIENCES

There is a lower basin within the incubator to hold the  water to control the humidity and the temperature control is fully automatic and contolled by a thermostat. The incubator also has a thermometer attached to read temperature inside the incubator. The light stays on while heating up to 100 deg F. After that the light bulb will flash.  Approximate capacity for the incubator is 12 hen eggs, 6 duck eggs, 4 – 6 turkey or goose, 20+  quail or partridge eggs & 15+ guinea fowl or pheasant eggs.

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Some useful books when starting out with incubating and hatching poultry eggs include Incubation At Home By Michael Roberts and Incubation: A Guide To Hatching And Rearing By Katie Thear.

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Water In Incubator

I have been asked about water in an incubator.

“Hi there I was wondering if you put water in the incubator when eggs are incubating ? Thanks write back asap. Ekram”

When incubating eggs the eggs need to have a level of humidity in the incubator in order to hatch. One way to attain the correct humidity levels for the eggs is to put water in the incubator during the incubation. Click on this link to learn about the different humidity levels for different types of eggs.

You can raise the humidity levels in an incubator by adding more water to the water trays in the incubator. You can also try to increase the humidity levels in the room in which the incubator is.

Other ways to increase the humidity levels in an incubator include:

* add a jar or tray of water
* add a wet towel

I believe that low humidity is caused by high temperatures which dry out the water trays in the incubator and help the humidity in the atmosphere evaporate.

Some people will do a dry incubation or dry hatch which means that they don’t put water in the incubator or put very little water in.

If you keep poultry or are interested in keeping poultry then visit the farmingfriends forum for the latest chat.

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Japanese Quail Eggs In Incubator

I filled my hovabator incubator with 42 Japanese quail eggs about 15 days ago. Japanese quail eggs take approximately 17 days to hatch. This morning I took the automatic egg turner out of the incubator and filled up the water trays to increase the humidity.

42 Japanese Quail Eggs In Incubator

42 Japanese Quail Eggs In Incubator

After lunch I thought I could hear some cheeping coming from the incubator and I even thought one of the eggs had pipped. When I looked later on I couldn’t see any sign of hatching.

I keep thinking I can hear cheeping and I have read that quail are supposed to call to each other whilst still in the egg in order to synchronise the hatch. I’ll keep you posted on the hatch.

If you keep quail and want to ask a question to get some advice or just to chat about your quail then why not join the free farmingfriends quail forum.

If you fancy having ago at incubating and hatching and if you live in the UK then I  have  quail eggs for hatching for sale.

Click on the image below to visit Amazon.co.uk to find out more about this incubator or visit one of the Farming Friends Bookshops.

Building Your Own Poultry Egg Incubator

You can make your own incubator using a cardboard box, wood or a polystyrene box and a heat lamp and making your own wet bulb for the humidity.  I was going to build my own poultry egg incubator but then a friend recommended  a Covina incubator for hatching my poultry eggs, as she had hatched 3 batches last year and hatched 19 out of 20 eggs set!

We have tried the Covina with bantom, quail and guinea fowl eggs and so far we’ve had approximately an 85 percent hatch rate.  Due to that success rate we never built our own incubator – we didn’t think we’d be able to get the necessary temperature control without spending an awful lot of money on a thermostatically controlled heating unit.  All in all we thought the Covina wouldn’t cost much more money than a DIY incubator and would do a better job – and so far it has.  However, when we were looking into building one we found the resources below.

Check out these links:
http://www.cyberquail.com/incubators.html
http://www.cornsnakefanclub.co.uk/incubator.html
http://www.urbanext.uiuc.edu/eggs/res20-incubator.html

If anyone has any tips on how to build your own poultry egg incubator or if you have done so and had good results then please leave a comment below.

12 Egg Poultry Incubator

Covina 12 Egg Incubator

If you are interested in incubating and hatching poultry eggs then check out the farmingfriends hen forum for the latest chat about incubating and hatching and then check out the books shown below which are informative and excellent for the beginner and a handy reference for those with more experience of incubating and hatching eggs.

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Which Incubator

I received a comment asking which incubator people would recommend,

I would like to buy an incubator with my 40th birthday money. We have a smallholding that is very new, so we don’t want anything massive, something suitable for pure breed chicken eggs (maran, light sussex etc) and ducks. We inherited some geese who we were told have rarely hatched anything themselves so maybe goose eggs too? It would need to have some automatic features but I wondered what people in the know would recommend – there seem to be so many options,
Thanks Lisa

Hi Lisa,
Happy 40th Birthday.Thanks for visiting the farmingfriends website and leaving a comment.
I have the Hova Bator Model 1592 Incubator from GQF with the GQF Automatic Egg Turner which holds 42 eggs from quail to duck eggs.
I have had some good results with the incubator although sometimes the eggs have been fertile and have not hatched out. I am not sure why this is, as there are many factors that can affect this that are to do with the incubator, eggs themselves or indeed the breeding flock.
The egg turner is very useful as this means that the eggs are no longer reliant on you turning them.
This incubator and egg turner are run on electricity and can be placed neatly in a small corner of a room.
I hope this information is useful to you.
Kind regards
Sara @ farmingfriends

If you have an incubator that you would like to recommend then please leave a comment, thanks.

Click on the image below to visit Amazon.co.uk to find out more about this incubator or visit one of the Farming Friends Bookshops.


Raising Humidity Levels In An Incubator

Different bird’s eggs require different humidity levels in the incubator. Sometimes the humidity levels get too high and need to be decreased and sometimes the humdity levels get too low and need to be raised. Marcia and her son have turkey eggs in the incubator but need help to raise the humidity.

can you tell me how to raise humidity in incubator for turkey eggs. we have a homemade incubator that measures approx. 36″ tall, 36″ deep and about 24″ side. It has 3 tray levels.
My son is trying to hatch turkey eggs and is having trouble getting humidity about 68. Any tips will be appreciated

Hi Marcia,
I believe that low humidity is caused by high temperatures which dry out the water trays in the incubator and help the humidity in the atmosphere evaporate. If you wish to increase the humidity levels in the incubator then add more water to the water trays in the incubator. You could also try to increase the humidity levels in the room in which the incubator is. You may also need to regulate the temperature in the room in which the incubator is in so that the temperature in the incubator doesn’t get too high.

I hope this information is of use and that the turkey eggs hatch out ok. Good luck and let us know how you get on.

Kind regards
Sara @ farmingfriends

If anyone has any tips on raising the humidity levels in an incubator then I would like to hear them, so please leave a comment.

Incubator Problems For Hatching Eggs

Hatching eggs in an incubator is not always easy as there are many variables that can affect the hatch.

I recently had 38 duck eggs in my incubator but have only 7 ducklings and only one hatched out without any help. I am not alone in finding hatching eggs in an incubator difficult.

My incubator is an ecostat incubator. The thing is i have never hatch any eggs yet i have put about 50 eggs in it. This is the second time this has happened. The eggs are fertile yet they do not hatch. I have cracked the eggs open and there are chicks fully developed. I opened the eggs a 5 days after the 3 weeks in incubation as there was no sigh of them hatching.
I don’t know what is wrong but it is really annoying me.
Anyone know what might be the matter ?
Conor

Erin left a reply comment:

Why don’t you let the hen sit on the eggs? I’ve just had a batch of lil us today to our surprise!! Our hen has been broody for a while and very angry towards to rooster. We let nature take over and sure enough the hen knew what to do. Lovely waking up and hearing little cheeps! Erin

I think that Erin is right in that a broody hen is often more successful than the incubator at hatching eggs, as nature should be!

But some of us do use an incubator to hatch eggs and it is useful to try to find out the reason why hatching is not successful so that incubation conditions can be improved and a successful hatch achieved.

Hi Conor,

I am sorry that you are having problems with your incubator. I know exactly how you feel. I had 38 duck eggs in mine and now have only 7 ducklings. Infact if I had not intervened I would only have 1 duckling.

There are many reasons why the chicks do not hatch:
Improper storage of eggs whereby the eggs become too cold.
Eggs not turned correctly.
Temperature incorrect – too low or too high.
Humidity incorrect – too low throughout incubation.
Improper ventilation.
Infection or disease.
Poor diet or poorly conditioned breeding stock.

Click on this link for more information. http://www.farmingfriends.com/reasons-why-fully-formed-chicks-may-not-hatch-out/

If you do have a broody hen or know someone who has and is willing to let their hen sit on your eggs then this is the best way to hatch eggs.

Hope this information is useful. Thanks for commenting. I hope you get the incubation sorted.

Sara @ farmingfriends

If you have any advice about using an incubator for hatching eggs then please leave a comment.

Preparing The Incubator Before Incubating Eggs

Preparing The Incubator For Use

  • Prepare the incubator 2-3 days before incubation.
  • Before incubating the eggs make sure that the incubator is thoroughly cleaned and sanitized.
  • Place the incubator in a room with a constant temperature and humidity.
  • The incubator should be placed on a flat surface.
  • Make sure that the incubator is placed away from drafts.
  • The incubator should not be placed in direct sunlight.
  • Keep the incubator in a different room from older birds.
  • Fill the water trough as directed by the incubator’s instructions.
  • Always check that the incubator is in working order before adding the eggs.
  • If the incubator has an automatic egg turner then check that this is in good working order before incubating the eggs.
  • Allow the incubator to warm up and adjust to the correct temperature and humidity before adding the eggs.

Check out the following books about incubating and hatching eggs.

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