Photo Hunt : Theme Wooden

There are lots of wooden objects and buildings on the farm but one of the most important wooden objects for a livestock farm are the feed troughs.

These feed troughs are in the fold yard and are used by the beef cattle.

The cattle get barley, fodder beet, potatoes or silage in these troughs depending on the time of year or the age or type of cattle.

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Photo Hunt : Theme Heavy

Lots of things are heavy on the farm.

A sow weighs approximately 200-300kg.

A straw bale weighs approximately 250kg.

A silage bale weighs approximately 600kg.

A cow weighs approximately 650kg.

A bull weighs approximately 900kg.

A modern tractor weighs approximately 5000kg. 

A combine harvester weighs approximately 10,000kg.

There are lots of heavy objects on the farm!

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Photo Hunt : Theme Narrow

The crops are planted in narrow rows so that the farmer can produce a good yield from the field.

Here is the sugar beet grown in narrow rows.

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Photo Hunt : Theme Old Fashioned

British Saddleback Pigs are an old fashioned rare breed of pig. They are a result of an amalgamation of two breeds, the Essex and the Wessex Saddleback.

British Saddleback pigs have;

  • A black coat with a white saddle just behind their front legs which goes all around their body in a band.
  • Lop ears over their faces.
  • Long and deep bodies.

British Saddlebacks are a hardy breed of pig and the sows are noted for their mothering ability.

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Photo Hunt : Theme Important

The theme for the photo hunt this week is important, so what is important on the farm?

The crops are very important.

WHEAT

Wheat in fieldWheat in storage

BARLEY

Barley in field.BarleyBarley grain in storage.

POTATOES

Planting Seed PotatoesPlanting Seed PotatoesPlanting Seed Potatoesirrigating-potatoes.jpg

OILSEED RAPE / CANOLA

oilseed-rape.jpg

Not only do the crops earn the farmers money, but the crops feed the animals on the farm and in turn make food that feeds the farmer!

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Photo Hunt : Theme Skinny

When piglets are born they are very skinny and it is important that they start to suckle straight away so that they can get enough of the sow’s milk and colostrum in order to grow quickly and be healthy. 

When our first litter of Saddleback piglets were born at the end of October 2007 all the piglets were very skinny like the little piglet in the picture.

Day old piglets feeding.It was amazing to see that after only minutes of being born the piglets were instinctively looking for their mother and trying to suckle. It didn’t take them long to get into a routine of feeding and suckling their mother’s milk. 

 

Saddleback piglets rooting about in straw.The piglets don’t stay skinny for long and only 2 and a half months on the piglets have grown to a fair size. My 15 piglets are now eating about 25kg of food in a day and a half!

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Photo Hunt : Theme Delicious

The theme for this week is delicious and this is an easy one for me. I knew straight away that one of the most delicious meals is my pot roasted guinea fowl recipe.

Pot Roasted Guinea FowlPot Roasted Guinea Fowl

We breed and raise guinea fowl. Some of the guinea fowl flock are breeding stock and then guinea hens are layers and other guinea fowl males are raised for their meat. For meat eaters like myself I am sure there is nothing more satisfying than to know where your meat has come from, what it has been fed and how it has been treated. I know that my guinea fowl eat well on a diet of layers pellets, grass, insects, greens and grain. They free range every day and seem to enjoy running up and down the farm yard and in and out of the fields. They always flock around the poultry hut at night and so I can assume that they are happy to go into the hut on a night so that they are safe from predators. Anyway guinea fowl meat is a little like pheasant and chicken. It has a mild gamey flavour and is tender and juicy as well as being a very lean meat. Guinea fowl meat has a good nutritional value.

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Photo Hunt : Theme Messy

It is messy in lots of places on the farm.

The fold yard has cattle manure and the pig stye has pig muck which I can tell you is very messy, but I thought I would spare you that sort of mess!

As I looked through my growing catalogue of photos I came across a photo of the mound of earth that was dug out of the ground where our new grain store now stands. The photo, although messy isn’t very interesting as it doesn’t even show the whole mound of earth.

So why am I showing you half a mound of messy earth?

Messy Mound Of Earth with a Surprise!Messy Mound Of Earth with a Surprise!

Well look closer to discover something else lurking in the photo to surprise and delight you.

Did you see it?

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  1. Definitely a bird in the shadows. Is it a robin? Great picture!

    Comment by The Rocky Mountain Retreat – December 28, 2007 @ 10:25 pm

  2. I must be blind. I had to click on the photo to see the bird and when I did it was clear as day. Great shot.

    Comment by Carver – December 28, 2007 @ 10:26 pm

  3. I thought this one would be an easy one for you, as I was expecting muck!

    Comment by rach – December 28, 2007 @ 11:38 pm

  4. You’re right, I dun see a mess. But I do see a beautiful bird 🙂

    Comment by napaboaniya – December 29, 2007 @ 12:42 am

  5. How fun to see the bird there! Hope you had a wonderful Christmas and a early Happy New Year to you!

    Comment by ellen b – December 29, 2007 @ 1:05 am

  6. I lived on a farm when I was much younger. Thanks for sparing me all the muck! hehe…

    Happy New Year dear Sara!!!

    Comment by eastcoastlife – December 29, 2007 @ 2:28 am

  7. Thanks for NOT posting cattle manure and pig muck! LOL! 🙂
    Nice bird. 🙂
    .-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-
    My photo hunts include road construction, a bad restaurant, and a driveway full of snow.

    Comment by Janna – December 29, 2007 @ 3:18 am

  8. what a cute bird! wonderful shot!

    happy holidays!

    Comment by maiylah – December 29, 2007 @ 3:47 am

  9. Oh thanks for Sparing us! 😉
    Cute bird!
    I did wonder what you would go for! 😉
    Hope you had a nice Christmas!

    Comment by SabineM – December 29, 2007 @ 4:07 am

  10. Nice shot! And the bird got in the way…. shooo!

    hehehe

    Comment by kljs – December 29, 2007 @ 4:35 am

  11. excellent photo, i made it larger

    Comment by sarge charlie – December 29, 2007 @ 1:29 pm

  12. wooohoooo!!! that’s really a messy one! indeed you have a great picture,keep it up…
    Happy New Year!

    Comment by denz – December 29, 2007 @ 2:55 pm

  13. Lovely shot! Almost too pretty to be messy. Have a good new Year!

    Comment by Dragonstar – December 29, 2007 @ 2:58 pm

  14. Nice shot – so funny with the cute bird!

    Comment by Randi – December 29, 2007 @ 3:19 pm

  15. Great shots of the bird. Is it a bullfinch? I’ve mislaid my reading glasses, so I’m squinting desperately at my screen, LOL.

    Happy New Year – I hope 2008 is a great year for you and yours.

    Comment by Siani – December 29, 2007 @ 7:18 pm

  16. Love the shot, Sara. Yup, like them,I was expecting to see something messy and smelly 😀

    Wishing you the best for 2008!

    My Messy Photo

    Comment by julie – December 30, 2007 @ 2:49 am

  17. Great shot of messy and the bird Sara.

    Wishing you and your family good health and a grace filled 2008.

    Comment by liza – December 30, 2007 @ 3:01 am

  18. Great entry for messy. Happy New Year!

    Comment by a simple life – December 30, 2007 @ 3:02 am

  19. Hi Sara, I was going to comment on this the other evening, but I was still going through a very horrible sickness bug and the thought of pig’s muck, well you can imagine! I remember the very fragrant smell of the spreader flicking up the muck right outside my bedroom window and cycling past the very deep slurry pit, always being thankful to have passed it without falling in! I wonder whether that lovely bird found anything interesting whilst it was burying its head in that muck! Louise x

    Comment by Louise – December 31, 2007 @ 1:37 pm

Photo Hunt : Theme Light

Hens need a certain amount of light in order to lay their eggs and this is why you generally find that hens lay their eggs in the Spring and Summer months.

Here is Hatty the hen laying her eggs.

laying-egg-1.jpglaying-egg-2.jpglaying-egg-3.jpghattys-egg.jpg

I was lucky enough to walk by Hatty’s nest as she was about to lay an egg and the egg laying moment was captured on camera.

Hens are also very aware of the light fading as night falls.

intree.jpg

My poultry often gather at the door of the poultry hut waiting to be let in as the light fades. If I get my timing wrong and I miss judge the amount of light outside, I can find Hatty and the guinea fowl roosting in the trees, on the roof trusses or on the hay bales.

As you can see light plays an important part in the life of the poultry.

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Photo Hunt: Theme Small

Quail eggs are very small and the quail that hatched out of these tiny eggs recently are the smallest animal I have had to look after.

The quail egg is about one fifth the size of an ordinary chicken egg.

Small day old quail chicks.The chicks that hatches out from these eggs are about the size of a bumble bee.

Although these chicks are extremely small at the start of their life, their development occurrs very quickly and within 6 weeks the hens start to lay their eggs.

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Click on the image below to visit Amazon.co.uk to find out more about this book or visit one of the Farming Friends Bookshops.

Quail, Past and Present (Gold Cockerel)