Chicken Vet Website

On my farmingfriends forum when the members need to take their poultry to the vets there is often talk about whether their vets have a specialist in poultry.

I am lucky where I live we have a local vets surgery with staff who are specially trained in avian veterinary.

I am writing this post as I have just been reading about the chicken vet website.

The Chicken Vet website provides advice on the care, health and well being of hens and offer recommendations on products to treat or maintain good health.

It also provides a network of “Chicken Friendly Vets” throughout the UK. The practices listed here are all Associated with Chicken Vet.

You can register on the website Chicken Vet and they will send you a welcome pack and information regarding your chosen practice.

Visit the Chicken Vet website.

If you keep hens or are interested in keeping hens then visit the farmingfriends hen forum for the latest chat about hens and then check out the books shown below about keeping hens which are informative and excellent for the beginner and a handy reference for the more experienced hens keeper.

Visit Wells Poultry For All Your Poultry Equipment & Housing

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Male To Female Ratio For Keeping Different Varieties Of Poultry

Here is a rough guide to the male to female ratio for keeping different varieties of poultry together.

Quail = 1 male to every 3-4 females.

Hen = 1 males to every 6-10 females. (The Domestic Fowl Trust normally recommend 1 male to 6 females for breeding chickens.)

Partridges = 1 male to 1 female.

Pheasants = 1 male to every 6-7 females.

Guinea fowl = 1 male to every 2-3 females. Although best paired up.

Ducks = 1 male to every 4-6 females. (Debbie at South Yeo Farm normally puts 1 drake with min of 6 ducks and she says, “but some are more rampant than others!” I too have 1 drake to 6 ducks.)

Turkeys = 1 male to every 10 females.

Geese = 1 male to every 4 females.

If you would like a book on keeping any of the birds mentioned in this article then visit the farmingfriends book shop.

If you keep poultry, gamebirds or waterfowl or are thinking of keeping pouultry, gamebirds or waterfowl then join the free farmingfriends forum.

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How to Keep Poultry Drinkers and Waterfowl Ponds From Freezing

With the recent Wintery weather in the UK and other countries suffering with snow, frosts and minus temperatures, there has been alot of debate about how to keep poultry drinkers and waterfowl ponds from freezing and keeping your poultry supplied with fresh water.

Looking for advice – we are in the north so we do get freezing temperatures. Obviously we can’t keep the wading pool open for our Khaki Campell’s and I am on my third solution for keeping them supplied with fresh water (I have 6 ducks) that doesn’t freeze. I would love to hear how others have solved this problem! Barbara


Here are some suggestions and solutions.

  • Take out buckets of hot water in the mornings and give them bowls/pools of lukewarm water. A washing up bowl or two would suffice for a while. They love the warmish water and take it in turns to bathe. We have been doing this twice a day during the very cold conditions. (Suggested by Sarah on the farmingfriends forum.)
  • Us a child’s old paddling pool or sandpit as an alternative to your pond,. If it freezes then you can tip hot water on top then smash and remove the ice. (Suggested by Mo on the farmingfriends forum.)
  • In some countries you can get special heaters (called a float heater) to place in the water, ponds and drinking troughs.
  • Keep a heat lamp above a metal drinker (the kind of heater used for chicks) and the water will not freeze. Please be aware of the fire risks with a heat lamp and make sure it is positioned high enough above so that any straw or wood (ie hut) doesn’t get hot and catch fire. (Suggested by Dorise on the farmingfriends forum.)
  • Use strong toughened plastic tubs that won’t crack when frozen or if you pour hot water onto them. (Suggested by Jonathan from the farmingfriends forum.) Jonathan suggests checking out your local feed-n-seed [Example:http://www.horseloverz.com/Rubber-Tub-Cr850---Black---15-Gallon-pr-307864.html].

Do you have any tips or solutions for keeping Poultry Drinkers and Waterfowl Ponds From Freezing, if so then let us know by leaving a comment or alternatively you can read and join the debate about this issue on the farmingfriends forum here http://farmingfriends.com/forums/topic.php?id=1356

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What Causes Curled Toes In Poultry?

I have been asked what cause curled toes in poultry and waterfowl chicks.

Curled toes is when the chick, keet or duckling is born with toes or feet that are curled up.

This can be caused by a number of things:

  • Curled feet can be genetic and due to inbreeding. It’s only safe to breed ducks down by three generations, thne new stock needs to be introduced.
  • It can be due to poor nutrition and a vitamin (riboflavin) defiency in the breeding stock.
  • It can also be due to infra red light in the brooder.
  • Conditions in the incubator can also lead to problems – bacteria in the incubator can lead to hatching problems and if bacteria has gone through the shell then it can effect the keet, duckling or chick.

A useful book for a poultry, game and waterfowl keepers is the book Poultry & Waterfowl Problems By Michael Roberts.

If you keep poultry or are thinking of keeping poultry then join the free farmingfriends forum for the latest chat, advice and questions about poultry and poultry related issues.

If you would like to receive regular information about poultry then why not sign up to the farmingfriends newsletter.

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